DConf 2018: Assemblage in Bavaria

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It’s official! The D Language Foundation has put out a call for submissions for the next iteration of the annual gathering of D programming language enthusiasts. DConf 2018, hosted by QA Systems, is taking place in Munich from May 2nd to the 5th, 2018.

This time around, there’s a focus on growth and outreach. DConf has always been open to all, but past editions largely targeted those already “in the know”. For DConf 2018, the D Language Foundation is actively reaching out, encouraging anyone with little or no D language experience to stop by and see what all the fuss is about.

In the coming months, the D Blog will feature a series of posts related to DConf 2018. To get us started, Andrei Alexandrescu, Vice President and Treasurer of the D Language Foundation, sat down to answer a few questions about the event.


Q: Thanks for taking time out of your schedule for this, Andrei. The first thing I want to get to is the choice of location. At the end of DConf 2017, there was a lot of speculation about where the next edition would be held. We’ve seen two in Menlo Park, California, one in Orem, Utah, and two in Berlin. What led to the choice of Munich?

A: It has a lot to do with my recent visit there. I had mentioned a while ago to our tireless collaborator Sebastian Wilzbach (who studies at both the Technical University of Munich and Ludwig Maximilian University) about the annual classes I teach in neighboring Stuttgart. He suggested I make two trips in one and give a talk in Munich as well.

Once we committed to a date, I was shocked by the earnestness of everybody involved with organizing. The event filled within an hour of opening, in comparable amounts by existing D programmers (there’s a strong D community in Munich) and by curious programmers coming from other languages. There was even some competition among companies willing to host the event.

We ended up holding it at Brainlab’s new headquarters (check it out, they are a great innovator in medical technology). The event was a triumph! The folks in the audience were that combination of smart, receptive, and inquisitive that makes for an amazing interaction. We started at 6:30 and quite a few of us segued into beers, dinner, and of course more chatting, to finally part around midnight.

At that point I thought, Munich sounds like a perfect place for DConf. Later I spoke to my business partner (Andreas Sczepansky, owner of QA Systems) about the great reception the talk got in Munich. He got intrigued and agreed to work with us on DConf 2018. And here we are.

Q: What can attendees expect to see at DConf 2018?

A: We’re counting on a strong technical program, as has been the case in the past events. Also, last year’s day-long hackathon (a largely unstructured “let’s work on cool stuff in small groups” day) was surprisingly successful and enjoyed by everyone involved. So we’re making it bigger and hopefully better this year. It will be on the last day of the event, May 5th.

This year we also want to promote a growth theme. We’re working on bringing a strong outside keynote speaker, and QA Systems will help us to market to companies and grass-roots coders who are currently using other languages. We believe D offers many strategic advantages to the high-tech milieu in Bavaria and beyond.

Q: What do you mean by that? What makes Bavaria special?

A: I noticed there’s a strong IT industry in the area built around automotive, industrial machinery, healthcare, scientific computing, and more. Really serious software with difficult demands and high stakes. We’re talking about systems ranging from memory-constrained embedded systems to high-performance desktop software to large systems that take a long time to design, build, and test. D is all about building fast software, fast. So we have a great opportunity to make the strong case that the D language could help these application domains.

Q: You and Walter Bright have traditionally given the opening and closing keynotes at every DConf. What are you guys planning to talk about this time?

A: I know Walter is considering giving a talk on Project Detente – a multifaceted approach to smooth interoperation with C and C++ that also allows easy incremental migration of large projects from those languages to D. As for me, I haven’t decided yet. I’m really excited by the opportunities opened by this Design by Introspection thing I discussed in my DConf 2017 keynote [Also, see the blog post he wrote about his presentation at Google’s Tel Aviv campus – Ed.].

Q: Last question: what’s the elevator pitch for DConf? If you only had 30 seconds to sell a prospective attendee on the event, what would you say?

A: D is a language with depth. Richness. It has unique solutions to some difficult problems, such as reconciling compile-time computation, partial evaluation, domain-specific languages, and metaprogramming all together in a wholesome manner. Such matters are so fundamental to the way we design, build, and execute our programs that we either consider them solved or unsolvable. Chances are, attending DConf will make you like the D language more. But more importantly, your view of your own métier will be improved regardless of your languages of choice.


Be sure to keep an eye on this space for more details about DConf 2018 as they are released. And if you’re planning to submit a talk, don’t procrastinate. The submission deadline is Feb 25th.

See you in Munich!

Introspection, Introspection Everywhere

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Prelude: Orem, UT, May 29 2015

Just finished delivering my keynote. Exiting the character, I’m half dead. People say it needs to look easy. Yeah, just get up there and start saying things. Like it’s natural. Spontaneous. Not for me it’s not. Weeks before any public talk, I can only think of how to handle it. What to say. What angles come up. The questions. The little jokes made in real time. Being consistently spontaneous requires so much rehearsal. The irony.

So all I want now is sneak into my hotel room. Replenish the inner introvert after the ultimate act of extroversion. Lay on the bed thinking “What the heck was that?” for the rest of the day. Bit of slalom to get to the door. Almost there. In the hallway, an animated gentleman talks to a few others. He sports a shaved head and a pair of eyebrows that just won’t quit. Stands just by the door, notices me in the corner of his eye, and it’s instantly clear to both of us he’s waiting for me. Still, he delicately gives me the chance to pretend I didn’t notice and walk around him. “Hi, I’m Andrei.” “Liran, co-founder and CTO of Weka.IO. I’m leaving a bit early and before that I wanted to tell you—you should come visit us in Tel Aviv. We’ve been using D for a year now in a large system. I think you’ll like what you see. I might also arrange you a Google tech talk and visits at a couple of universities. Think it over.”

Tel Aviv, May 8 2017

Coming out of the hotel, heat hits like a punch. We’re talking 41 Celsius (before you pull that calculator: 106 Fahrenheit), if you’re lucky to be in the shade. Zohar, software engineer and factotum extraordinaire at Weka, is driving us on the busy streets of Tel Aviv to his employer’s headquarters. A fascinating exotic place, so far away from my neck of the woods.

First, Liran gives me an overview of their system—a large-scale distributed storage based on flash memory. Not my specialty, so I’m desperately searching my mind for trick questions—Information Theory—wait! peeps a lonely neuron who hasn’t fired since 1993—Reed-Solomon and friends, used to know about it. (Loved that class. The professor was quite a character. Wrote anticommunist samizdat poetry before it was cool. Or even legal. True story.) “How do you deal with data corruption when you have such a low write amplification?” “Glad you asked!” (It’s actually me who’s glad. Yay, I didn’t ask a stupid question.) “We use a redundant encoding with error correction properties; you get to choose the trade-off between redundancy and failure tolerance. At any rate, blind data duplication is mathematically a gross thing to do.” I ask a bunch more questions, and clearly these guys did their homework. The numbers look impressive, too—they beat specialized hardware at virtually all metrics. “What’s the trick?” I finally ask. Liran smiles. “I get that all the time. There’s not one trick. There’s a thousand carefully motivated, principled things we do, from the high level math down to the machine code in the drivers. The trick is to do everything right.”

We now need to hop to my first stop of the tour—Tel Aviv University. Liran accompanies me, partly to see his alma mater after twenty years. Small, intimate audience; it’s the regular meeting of their programming languages research group. A few graduate students, a postdoc, and a couple of professors. The talk goes over smoothly. We get to spend five whole minutes on an oddball—what’s the role of the two semicolons in here?

mixin(op ~ "payload;");

It’s tricky. mixin is a statement so it needs a terminator, hence the semicolon at the very end. In turn, mixin takes a string (the concatenation of variable op, which in this case happens to be either "++" or "--", and "payload;") and passes it to the compiler as a statement. Mix this string in the code, so to say. It follows that the string ultimately compiled is "++payload;" or "--payload;". The trick is the generated statement needs its own semicolon. However, within an expression context, mixin is an expression so no more need for the additional semicolon:

auto x = mixin(op ~ "payload"); // mixin is an expression here, no semicolon!

This seems to leave one researcher a bit unhappy, but I point out that all macro systems have their oddities. He agrees and the meeting ends on a cordial note.

The evening ends with dinner and beers with engineers at Weka. The place is called “Truck Deluxe” and it features an actual food truck parked inside the restaurant. We discuss a million things. I am so galvanized I can only sleep for four hours.

May 9 2017

Omg omg OMG. The alarm clock rings at 6:50 AM, and then again at 7 and 7:10, in ever more annoying tones. Just as I’d set it up anticipating the cunning ways of my consciousness to become alert just enough to carefully press the stop—careful, not the snooze—button, before slumbering again. Somewhat to my surprise I make it in time for meeting Liran to depart to Haifa. Technion University is next.

Small meeting again; we start with a handful of folks, but word goes on the grapevine and a few more join during the act. Nice! I pity Liran—he knows the talk by heart by now, including my jokes. I try to make a couple new ones to entertain him a bit, too. It all goes over nicely, and I get great questions. One that keeps on coming is: how do you debug all that compile-time code? To which I quip: “Ever heard of printf-based debugging? Yeah, I thought so. That’s pretty much what you get to do now, in the following form:”

pragma(msg, string_expression);

The expression is evaluated and printed if and only if the compiler actually “goes through” that line, i.e. you can use it to tell which branch in a static if was taken. It is becoming clear, however, that to scale up Design by Introspection more tooling support would be needed.

Back at Weka, as soon as I get parked by a visitor desk, folks simply start showing up to talk with me, one by one or in small groups. Their simple phonetic names—Eyal, Orem, Tomer, Shachar, Maory, Or, …—are a welcome cognitive offload for yours socially inept truly. They suggest improvements to the language, ask me about better ways to do this or that, and show me code that doesn’t work the way it should.

In this faraway place it’s only now, as soon as I see their code, that I feel at home. They get it! These people don’t use the D language like “whatevs”. They don’t even use it as “let’s make this more interesting.” They’re using it as strategic advantage to beat hardware storage companies at their own game, whilst moving unfairly faster than their software storage competitors. The code is as I’d envisioned the D language would be used at its best for high leverage: introspection, introspection everywhere. Compile time everything that can be done at compile time. It’s difficult to find ten lines of code without a static if in there—the magic fork in design space. I run wc -l and comment on the relatively compact code base. They nod approvingly. “We’ve added a bunch of features since last year, yet the code size has stayed within 5%.” I, too, had noticed that highly introspective code has an odd way of feeding upon itself. Ever more behaviors flow through the same lines.

Their questions and comments are intent, focused, so much unlike the stereotypical sterile forum debate. They have no interest to show off, prove me wrong, or win a theoretical argument; all they need is to do good work. It is obvious to all involved that a better language would help them in the way better materials can help architects and builders. Some template-based idioms are awfully slower to compile than others, how can we develop some tooling to inform us about that? Ideas get bounced. Plans emerge. I put a smudgy finger on the screen: “Hmm, I wonder how that’s done in other languages.” The folks around me chuckle. “We couldn’t have done that in any other language.” I decide to take it as a compliment.

A few of us dine at a fancy restaurant (got to sample the local beer—delicious!), where technical discussions go on unabated. These folks are sharp, full of ideas, and intensely enthusiastic. They fully realize my visit there offers the opportunity to shed collective months of toil from their lives and to propel their work faster. I literally haven’t had ten minutes with myself through the day. The only time I get to check email on my phone is literally when I lock myself into (pardon) a restroom stall. Tomorrow my plan is to sleep in, but there’s so much going on, and so much more yet to come, that again I can only sleep a couple of hours.

May 10 2017

Today’s the big day: the Google Campus Tel Aviv talk. We’re looking at over 160 attendees this evening. But before that there’s more talking to people at Weka. Attribute calculus comes on the table. So for example we have @safe, @trusted, and @system with a little algebra: @safe functions can call only @safe and @trusted functions. Any other function may call any function, and inference works on top of everything. That’s how you encapsulate unsafe code in a large system—all nice and dandy. But how about letting users define their own attributes and calculi? For example, a “may switch fibers” attribute such that functions that yield cannot be called naively. Or a “has acquired a lock” attribute. From here to symbolic computation and execution cost estimation the road is short! To be sure, that would complicate the language. But looking at their code it’s clear how it would be mightily helped by such stuff.

I got a lunchtime talk scheduled with all Weka employees in attendance, but I’m relaxed—by this point it’s just a family reunion. Better yet, one in which I get to be the offbeat uncle. My only concern is novelty—everything I preach, these folks have lived for two years already. Shortly before the talk Liran comes to me and asks “Do you think you have a bit more advanced material for us?” Sorry mate, I’m at capacity over here—can’t produce revolutionary material in the next five minutes. Fortunately the talk goes well in the sense that Design by Introspection formalizes and internalizes the many things they’ve already been doing. They appreciate that, and I get a warm reception and a great Q&A session.

As I get to the Google campus in Tel Aviv, late afternoon, the crowds start to gather. This is big! And I feel like I’d kill myself right now! I mentioned I take weeks to prepare a single public appearance, by the end of which I will definitely have burned a few neurons. And I’m fine with that—it’s the way it’s supposed to be. Problem is, this one week packs seven appearances. The hosts offer me coffee before, during, and after the talk. Coffee in Israel is delicious, but I’m getting past the point where caffeine may help.

Before the talk I get to chit chat incognito with a few attendees. One asks whether a celebrity will be speaking. “No, it’s just me.” He’s nice enough to not display disappointment.

There’s something in the air that tells you immediately whether an audience will be welcoming or not so much. Like a smell. And the scent in this room is fabulously festive. These folks are here to have a good time, and all I need to do to keep the party going is, in the words of John Lakos, “show up, babble, and drool.” The talk goes over so well, they aren’t bored even two hours later. Person in the front row seems continuously confused, asks a bunch of questions. Fortunately we get to an understanding before resorting to the dreaded “let’s take this offline.” Best questions come of course from soft-spoken dudes in the last row. As I poke fun at Mozilla’s CheckedInt, I realize Rust is also Mozilla’s and I fear malice by proxy will be alleged. Too late. (Late at night, I double checked. Mozilla’s CheckedInt is just as bad as I remembered. They do a division to test for multiplication overflow. Come on, put a line of assembler in there! Portability is worth a price, just not any price.) My talk ends just in time for me to not die. I’m happy. If you’re exhausted it means it went well.

May 11 2017

Again with the early wake-up, this time to catch a train to Beersheba. Zohar rides with me. The train is busy with folks from all walks of life. I trip over the barrel of a Galil. Its owner—a girl in uniform—exchanges smiles with me.

Two talks are on the roster today, college followed by Ben Gurion University. The first goes well except one detail. It’s so hot and so many people in the room that the AC decides—hey, y’know, I don’t care much for all that Design by Introspection. It’s so hot, folks don’t even bother to protest my increasingly controversial jokes about various languages. I take the risk to give them a coffee break in the middle thus giving them the opportunity to leave discreetly. To my pleasant surprise, they all return to the sauna for part deux.

The AC works great at Ben Gurion University, but here I’m facing a different problem: it’s the dreaded right-after-lunch spot and some people have difficulty staying awake. Somebody gives up and leaves after 20 minutes. Fortunately a handful of enthused (and probably hungry) students and one professor get into it. The professor really likes the possibilities opened by Design by Introspection and loves the whole macro expansion idea. Asks me a bazillion questions after the talk that make it clear he’s been hacking code generation engines for years. Hope to hear back from him.

Just when I think I’m done, there’s one more small event back at Weka. A few entrepreneurs and executives, friends of Weka’s founders, got wind of their successful use of the D language and were curious to have a sit down with me. One researcher, too. I’m well-prepared for a technical discussion: yes, we know how to do safety. We have a solution in the works for applications that don’t want the garbage collector. “So far so good,” told himself the lamb walking into the slaughterhouse.

To my surprise, the concerns these leaders have are entirely nontechnical. It’s all about community building, leadership, availability of libraries and expertise, website, the “first five minutes” experience, and such. These people have clearly have done their homework; they know the main contributors by name along with their roles, and are familiar with the trendy topics and challenges within the D language community.

“Your package distribution system needs ranking,” mentions a CTO to approving nods from the others. “Downloads, stars, activity—all criteria should be available for sorting and filtering. People say github is better than sourceforge because the latter has a bunch of crap. In fact I’m sure github has even more crap than sourceforge, it’s just that you don’t see it because of ranking.”

“Leadership could be better,” mentions a successful serial entrepreneur. “There’s no shortage of great ideas in the community, and engagement should be toward getting work done on those great ideas. Problem is, great ideas are easy to debate against because almost by definition what makes them great is also what takes them off the beaten path. They’re controversial. There’s risk to them. They may even seem impossible. So those get pecked to death. What gets implemented is good ideas, the less controversial ones. But you don’t want to go with the good ideas. You want the great ideas.”

And so it goes for over three hours. My head is buzzing with excitement as Zohar drives us back to the hotel. The ideas. The opportunities. The responsibility. These people at Weka have a lot riding on the D language. It’s not only money—”not that there’s anything wrong with that!”—but also their hopes, dreams, pride of workmanship. The prime of their careers. We’ve all got our work cut out for us.

I tell Zohar no need to wake up early again tomorrow, I’ll just get a cab to the airport. I reckon a pile of backlogged work is waiting for him. He’s relieved. “Man, I’m so glad you said that. I’m totally pooped after this week. I don’t know how you do it.”

Funny thing is, I don’t know either.

DConf 2017 Ex Post Facto

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Another May, another DConf in the rear view. This year’s edition, organized and hosted once again by the talented folks from Sociomantic, and emceed for the second consecutive year by their own Dylan Cromwell, brought more talks, more fun, and an extra day. The livestream this year, barring a glitch or two with the audio, went almost perfectly. And for the first time in DConf history, videos of the talks started appearing online almost as soon as the conference was over. The entire playlist is available now.

As usual, there were three days of talks. The first opened with a keynote by Walter and the last with one by Andrei (he gave a longer version of the same talk at Google’s Tel Aviv campus a few days later). The keynote from Scott Meyers on Day Two, in his second DConf appearance, was actually the second talk of the day thanks to some technical issues. He told everyone about the things he finds most important in software development, a talk recommended for any developer no matter their language of preference.

The keynotes were followed by presentations from a mix of DConf veterans and first-time speakers. This year, livestream viewers were treated to some special segments during the lunch breaks. On Day One, Luís Marques showed off a live demo using D as a hardware description language, which had been the subject of his presentation just before the lunch break (he used a Papillo Pro from Gadget Factory in his demo, and the company was kind enough to provide an FPGA for one lucky attendee to take home). On Day Two, Vladimir Panteleev, after being shuffled from the second spot to the first in the lineup, gave a livestream demo of concepts he had discussed in his talk on Practical Metaprogramming. And on the last day of presentations, Bastiaan Veelo presented the livestream audience with an addendum to his talk, Extending Pegged to Parse Another Programming Language.

Day Two closed out with a panel discussion featuring Scott, Walter and Andrei.

Scott Meyers, Walter Bright, and Andrei Alexandrescu in a panel discussion moderated by Dylan Cromwell.

It was during this discussion that Walter made the claim that memory safety will be the bane of C, eliciting skepticism from Scott Meyers. That exchange prompted more discussion on /r/programming almost two weeks later.

The newest segment of the event this year came in the form of an extra day given over entirely to the DConf Hackathon. As originally envisioned, it was never intended to be a hackathon in the traditional sense. The sole purpose was for members of the D community to get together face-to-face and hash out the pain points, issues, and new ideas they feel strongly about. DConf 2016 had featured a “Birds of a Feather” session, with the goal of hashing out a specific category of issues, as part of the regular talk lineup. It didn’t work out as intended. The hackathon, suggested by Sebastian Wilzbach, was conceived as an expansion of and improvement upon that concept.

The initial plan was to present attendees with a list of issues that need resolving in the D ecosystem, allow them to suggest some more, and break off into teams to solve them. Sebastian put a lot of effort into a shared document everyone could add their ideas and their names to. As it turned out, participants flowed naturally through the venue, working, talking, and just getting things done. Some worked in groups, others worked alone. Some, rather than actively coding, hashed out thorny issues through debate, others provided informal tutoring or advice. In the end, it was a highly productive day. Perhaps the most tangible result was, as Walter put it, “a tsunami of pull requests.” It’s already a safe bet that the Hackathon will become a DConf tradition.

In the evenings between it all, there was much food, drink, and discussion to be had. It was in this “downtime” where more ideas were thrown around. Some brought their laptops to hack away in the hotel lobby, working on pet projects or implementing and testing ideas as they were discussed. It was here where old relationships were strengthened and new ones formed. This aspect of DConf can never be overstated.

A small selection of more highlights that came out of the four days of DConf 2017:

  • Walter gave the green light to change the D logo and a strategy was devised for moving forward.
  • Jonathan Davis finally managed to get std.datetime split from a monolithic module into a package of smaller modules.
  • Some contentious issues regarding workflow in the core repositories were settled.
  • Vladimir Panteleev gave DustMite the ability to reduce diffs.
  • Timon Gehr implemented static foreach (yay!).
  • Ali Çehreli finished updating his book Programming in D to 2.074.0.
  • Nemanja Boric fixed the broken exception handling on FreeBSD-CURRENT.
  • Steven Schveighoffer and Atila Neves earned their wizard hats for submitting their first pull requests to DMD.
  • Adrian Matoga and Sönke Ludwig (and probably others) worked on fixing issues with DUB.
  • Progress was made on the D compiler-as-a-library front.

This is far from an exhaustive list. The venue was a hive of activity during that last day, and who knows what else was accomplished in the halls, restaurants, and hotel lobbies. This short list only scratches the surface.

A very big Thank You to everyone at Sociomantic who treated us to another spectacular DConf. We’re already looking forward to DConf 2018!

Thanks Sociomantic!

The DConf Experience

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April 23rd, the deadline for DConf 2017 registrations, is just a few days away. Personally, I wasn’t sure if I’d be able to attend this year or not, but fortunately things worked out. While I’m looking forward to more great presentations this year, that’s not what keeps drawing me back (or makes me regret being unable to attend in 2014 and 2015).

The main draw for me is putting faces to all the GitHub and forum handles, then getting the opportunity to reconnect in person with those I’ve met at past conferences to talk about more than just the D programming language or the projects to which we all contribute.

I’m not the only one who feels that way. Walter Bright had this to say of DConf 2016:

Besides the technical content, I enjoyed the camaraderie of the conference. The pleasant walking and talking going between the Ibis hotel and the conference. The great food and conversations at the event. Chatting at the Ibis after hours.

If you’re staying at the Hotel Ibis Neukölln (which, unfortunately, is booked solid the week of the conference last I heard) and you’re an early riser, you’ll likely find Walter down in the lobby having First Breakfast and up for a good conversation.

Of course, the mingling isn’t necessarily confined to the conference hall or the hotel lobby. Conference goers sometimes share a room in order to save costs. That’s a great opportunity to learn something new about someone you might not otherwise have discovered, as GDC meister Iain Buclaw found out at DConf 2013 when he and Manu Evans were roomies for a few days:

I recall that I had gotten some microwavable food from the nearby groceries ahead of his arrival — “I didn’t know what you would like, or if you had allergies, so I went with the safe option and only got Vegan foods”. It was a pleasant surprise to discover we have a diet in common also.

At that edition, Iain, Manu and Brad Roberts were shuttled to and from the conference by Walter in his rental car. Carpooling has been a common part of the Stateside DConfs. At the venue in Berlin, there’s no need for it. The semi-official hotel is in walking distance and there’s a subway stop nearby for those who are further off. And, as Steven Schveighoffer can attest, rental bicycles are always an option.

I remember last year, Joseph Wakeling, Andrew Edwards and his son, and myself went for a great bike tour of Berlin given by native David Eckardt of Sociomantic. This included the experience of dragging our rented bikes on the subway, and getting turned away by police in riot gear when we had inadvertently tried to go somewhere that political demonstrations were happening. Highly recommended for anyone, especially if David is gracious enough to do the tour again! We randomly met Ethan Watson riding a rented bike along the way too 🙂

Speaking of Ethan, it appears there’s a good reason that he was riding his bike alone and in the wrong direction.

My first BeerConf was in 2016, located in the rather interesting city of Berlin. Every evening, we would gather and drink large amounts of very cheap beer. This would also coincide with some rather enjoyable shenanigans, be they in-depth conversations; pub crawls; more in-depth conversations; convenience store crawls (where the beer is even cheaper); even more in-depth conversations; and a remarkable lack of late night food.

Hours during the day were passed away at a parallel conference that I kinda stumbled in to, DConf. Interestingly, this was stocked with the same characters that I socialised with during BeerConf. Maybe I was drunk then. Maybe I’m drunk now. Did I present a talk there? I think I did, although I can only assume the talk did not have anything to do with beer.

I’ve found out recently that I’m dual-booked for BeerConf 2017 as well as presenting again at DConf. Since attending these events can only be achieved through a submission process my deduction is that I had a thoroughly good time meeting all these people and socialising them, as well as sharing knowledge and technical expertise, and decided I must do it again. Either that, or someone else signed me up. Don’t tell me which option is the truth, I’ll work it out.

Yes, the beer is a big part of it, too. This blog was born at the small bar in the lobby of the Ibis, over a couple of cold ones and the background cacophony of D programmer talk. Who could say what new D initiatives will spawn from the fermented grains this year?

But let’s not forget the presentations. While they’ll be livestreamed and those who don’t attend can watch them on YouTube in perpetuity, the social aspect lends a flavor to them that the videos just can’t. Andrew Edwards is a fan of one speaker in particular.

I’m always fascinated by Don Clugston’s talks. The most memorable is DConf 2013, during which he stated that, “The language made minor steps… We got here like miners following a vein of gold, not by an original master plan,” in his explanation of how D arrived at its powerful metaprogramming capabilities.

Where else can you hear “wonks” recounting their first hand experiences of what makes D “berry, berry good” for them? It is just a great experience talking and exchanging ideas with some of the greatest minds in the D community.

And there’s no substitute for being in the room when something unexpected happens, as it did during Stefan Koch’s lightning talk at DConf 2016, when he wanted to do a bit of live coding on stage.

There was no DMD on the computer 🙂 That surprised me.

Whether your interest is social, technical, alcohological, or otherwise, DConf is just a fun place to be. If you have the time and the means to attend, you’re  warmly invited to make your own DConf memories. Do yourself a favor and register before the window closes. If you can’t make it, be sure to follow the livestream (pay attention to the Announce forum for details) or pull up #D on freenode.net to ask questions of the presenters. But we really hope to see you there!

I’ll leave you to consider Andrei Alexandrescu’s take on DConf, which concisely sums up the impact the conference has on many who attend:

To me, DConf has already become the anchoring event that has me inspired and motivated for the whole year. We are a unique programming language community in that we’re entirely decentralized geographically. Even the leadership is spread all over across the two US coasts, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and Asia. Therefore, the event that brings us all together is powerful – an annual systole of the live, beating heart of a great community.

We don’t lack a good program with strong talks, but to me the best moments are found in the interstices – the communal meals, the long discussions with Walter and others in the hallway, the late nights in the hotel lobby. All of these are much needed accelerated versions of online exchanges.

I’m very much looking forward to this year’s edition. In addition to the usual suspects, we’ll have a strong showing of work done by our graduate scholarship recipients.

Thanks to Walter, Iain, Steven, Ethan, Andrew, Stefan and Andrei for sharing their anecdotes and thoughts.