Category Archives: DMD Releases

DLang News September/October 2021: D 2.098.0, OpenBSD, SAOC, DConf Online Swag

Digital Mars D logo

Version 2.098.0 of the D programming language is now available in the form of DMD 2.098.0 (the reference D compiler) and LDC 1.28.0 (the LLVM-based D compiler), D has come to OpenBSD, cool things are happening thanks to the Symmetry Autumn of Code, and DConf Online 2021 t-shirts are available for purchase.

Read on for the deets.

DMD 2.098.0

This release comes with 17 major changes and 160 fixed Bugzilla issues from 62 contributors across the core repositories. The number of fixed issues may well be a record high. The 2.097.0 release had 144, and the 2.094.0 release had 119, but a cursory look at several other major releases shows numbers ranging from the high 40s to under 100, with counts in the 50s showing up frequently. This is the sort of trend we were hoping to see when Razvan Nitu came on board as our Pull Request and Issue Manager, and we couldn’t be more pleased.

There are two items of note that I’d like to point out from the new release, and then I have a little more to say about the work Razvan is doing.

ImportC

The ImportC compiler is a major enhancement to D that allows the D compiler to directly compile C source code. Walter has been working on it for a few months now, and this is the first release in which it’s available. ImportC enables the compiler to inline C function calls and even evaluate them at compile time via CTFE. ImportC targets C11 and does not currently handle preprocessor directives, so any C source you do intend to compile must first be run through a preprocessor. It’s not yet complete, but if you have a use case for it, any help in finding and reporting ImportC bugs is welcome. Contributions to fix said bugs doubly so!

Fork-based garbage collector

This release also includes an optional concurrent garbage collector for Posix systems. This is cool in and of itself, but more so because the project came to fruition thanks to the Symmetry Autumn of Code. It was originally developed for D1 by Leandro Lucarella but was never included in an official release (using alternative GCs back then required more than just a simple command-line switch). In 2018, for the inaugural edition of SAOC, Francesco Mecca undertook to port the GC to D2. This resulted in a pull request to DRuntime that was ultimately merged in time for this release by Rainer Schuetze.

To use the new GC, provide the DRuntime option --DRT-gcopt=fork:1 on the command-line of any program compiled against DRuntime 2.098.0+ (this is not a compiler option, but an option to any program linked with DRuntime). It can also be configured programmatically via:

extern(C) __gshared string[] rt_options = [ "gcopt=fork:1" ];

See the D documentation for more GC configuration options.

Shrinking the pull-request queues

Razvan has been managing pull requests across several of our repositories, but he’s been laser-focused on reducing the number of PRs in the phobos and druntime repositories, with dmd his next target. This isn’t just about lowering the PR count. He’s been reviving old PRs with the original author where he can (he tells me he was surprised how many PR authors were responsive, even after no activity on a PR for a few years) and has tried to rebase and resolve those where he can’t. Here are some statistics he’s gathered on PR activity so far this year across the phobos, druntime, and dmd repositories:

  • phobos: 568 PRs created, 650 PRs closed
  • druntime: 283 PRs created, 311 PRs closed
  • dmd: 1140 PRs created, 1126 closed

At the time he sent me the stats on October 29th, the number of open PRs in phobos had gone down from 160 to 77 and druntime from 130 to 96. The number of open PRs in dmd has remained fairly constant at around 230.

We want to thank Razvan for all the work he is doing, Symmetry Investments for sponsoring his position, the volunteer members of the “strike teams” Razvan has assembled to squash as many bugs as possible, and every contributor who has donated and continues to donate their time and effort to improving our favorite programming language.

LDC 1.28.0

The latest release of LDC implements D 2.098.0 (D frontend, DRuntime, and Phobos) and is compatible with LLVM 6.0 – 12.0.

A major item in this release is that LDC now supports dynamic casts across binary boundaries. DLL support has long been a weak point in D, often requiring the programmer to resort to extern(C) functions that return handles (pointers, references) to D objects. Martin Kinkelin has worked to improve the situation in LDC, motivated primarily by the desire to provide the standard library and runtime as a DLL on Windows.

Thanks to Martin and all the LDC contributors for the work they do to keep LDC releases in sync with those of DMD. If you benefit from their efforts, please consider sponsoring Martin (and LDC by extension) on GitHub!

D on OpenBSD

The D ecosystem grows primarily because of the efforts of volunteers who step forward to fill in the blanks. New D projects pop up all the time, but it’s pretty rare to hear that someone has brought D to a new platform. Brian Callahan has done just that.

Brian has been on a mission to bring D to OpenBSD. In August of this year, he popped into the D forums with an announcement that GDC, the GCC-based D compiler maintained by Iain Buclaw, was now available in the OpenBSD ports tree as part of GCC 11. In early October, he let us know that DMD was coming to the platform. Then in late October, he had the same news about LDC. Instructions for installing DMD on OpenBSD are on the download page (and can be extrapolated to LDC and GDC).

We are grateful to Brian for the work he has done to make this happen. We’re looking forward to his upcoming DConf Online 2021 talk, Life Outside the Big 4: The Adventure of D on OpenBSD:

The journey of D from pie-in-the-sky to a package officially offered in the OpenBSD package repository serves as a model story for other platforms who want to offer D to their userbase. We will walk through the many interconnected parts required to get a D package on OpenBSD, what the future is like for D outside the Big 4, how you can get started with D on your platform, and how those of us who enjoy life outside the Big 4 can be a positive force for D and the D community.

SAOC News

The SAOC 2021 progress bar is past the 25% mark. The first milestone wrapped up on October 15, and the participants have been posting weekly progress reports in the General Forum. It’s always interesting to read about the challenges they encounter and their solutions. But the latest SAOC isn’t the only edition about which there is news to report.

I’ve written above about the SAOC 2018 forking GC project that has found its way into the latest release of DRuntime. I can’t begin to tell you how pleased I am that another SAOC project has come into its own.

For SAOC 2020, Adela Vais set out to implement a D backend for the venerable Bison parser generator. Not only did Adela successfully complete SAOC, she saw her project through to its ultimate goal. The D backend was officially released as part of Bison 3.81 in September.

We want to offer Adela our congratulations and a huge round of applause for a job well done! Getting a project of this scope accepted into a GNU codebase is no mean feat.

DConf Online 2021 T-Shirts

DConf Online 2021 is less than a month away. The D Language Foundation will be providing DConf Online 2021 swag to the DConf speakers and prizes to viewers asking questions in the post-talk live stream Q & A sessions. The cost of the items and their shipping are the only DConf Online expenses, and they’re covered by the D Language Foundation General Fund.

Direct donations to the General Fund and our more targeted funds are always appreciated, but you can also help support the D programming language and DConf Online by purchasing a DConf Online 2021 T-Shirt or other D swag in the DLang Swag Emporium. All proceeds go straight into the General Fund. You get some swag along with our gratitude, and we get a couple of bucks. That’s a pretty good deal!

Looking Forward

As we near the end of 2021, we are looking forward to 2022 and beyond. The D programming language, its ecosystem, and its community have come a long way from the gaggle of curious coders who first took an interest in a one-man project by the guy who had created the game Empire and the Zortech C++ compiler.

The primary means of contributing to the core D projects went from emailing patches to Walter, to posting patches on Bugzilla, to committing to a Subversion repository, to submitting pull requests on GitHub. The web site went from being a few basic HTML pages of the D spec on digitalmars.com maintained only by Walter, to a simple HTML site designed by a community member under the dlang.org domain, to the more complex collection of pages and scripts that today is maintained in Ddoc by multiple contributors. The ecosystem has gone from random libraries and tools hosted by individuals on myriad services, to centralized hosting at dsource.org, to the package repository at code.dlang.org.

These are just some examples of major changes over the years, each in response to growth: as the community grew in size, some of the processes and systems began to burst at the seams. To continue to grow, something had to change. Such improvements have nearly always been the result of community action: discussion and debate in the forums eventually would lead to a champion stepping forward to make it happen. Community action has been the driving force of D since Walter first announced the “D alpha compiler” in late 2001. That’s still true today. We have a handful of paid positions, but we are still primarily driven by volunteers.

The see-a-problem-and-fix-it philosophy that carried D to where we are today has served us well, and we hope it will continue to do so into the future. But that alone is no longer enough. We are bursting at the seams again, and have been for some time. In the monthly foundation meetings, we’ve been discussing specific issues, both low level and high, and how to solve them. But there’s one thing that’s been missing from the equation: organization.

Razvan Nitu’s position as Pull Request & Issue Manager grew out of an email discussion, prompted by Laeeth Isharc, and was a year in the making. We are grateful for every volunteer who has and continues to make themselves available to review pull requests. Razvan is here not to replace them, but to complement them. They can continue as they have done. What Razvan brings to the mix is organization. He’s there to make sure fewer issues and PRs fall through the cracks, to ensure that as many issues as possible that can be resolved are resolved.

In November, the D Language Foundation and a couple of contributors are meeting with a community member who has graciously volunteered his time and expertise to advise us on how to bring the disparate servers in the D community under Foundation management and multiple admins. The end goals are to eliminate the financial burden on the volunteers who maintain these services and, hopefully, reduce the response time when it comes to solving server-related issues or making changes. In other words, organization.

I’m in the middle of revising the Vision Document that we put together over the summer. I’m not just editing it, though. I’m expanding it. My vision of the vision document has evolved since we first discussed a “goal-oriented task list” in our June meeting. I said at the time that I didn’t “know what the initial version of the final list will look like”. I feel that what we came up with falls short of meeting the need it was intended to fill. Now, I’m pretty sure of what it needs to look like. At the moment, I’m swamped in preparations for DConf Online 2021, so I’ve put the document on the backburner. I plan to pick it up again in early December and present my revisions at the last foundation meeting of the year for approval. If all goes well, it should be published on dlang.org in January. This will be a living document, updated to reflect current priorities as time goes by.

Mathias Lang is working on a proposal to bring organization into even more of our processes. It’s a modified version of the governance proposal he brought to the September foundation meeting, the aim of which is to formalize a core team to oversee the day-to-day guidance and management of the D ecosystem. I hope that this will take what already happens in our monthly meetings to the next level. I see this as a means to establish a framework for creating workgroups that can oversee specific tasks and projects, bringing more opportunities for follow-up and follow-through. It should also help provide guidance and establish priorities (e.g., via revisions to the vision document) so that independent contributors can direct their efforts not just to the issues they care about, but those that are seen as a priority by the core team. (I want to emphasize that this is my personal view. Mathias has yet to complete the proposal. But my view is informed by what we discussed in the September meeting.)

With these and future steps aimed at better organizing our community, we intend to level up our ecosystem: motivate library development, improve the onboarding experience, increase retention, make it easier to contribute, and generally resolve the long-standing issues that tarnish the experience of using the best programming language we know. We ask our current volunteers to keep volunteering, and those who aren’t yet doing so to keep an eye out for the right opportunity to pitch in. Together, we can get to where we all want to go.

D News Roundup

Version 2.097.0 of DMD, the D programming language reference compiler, was released on June 5th in the middle of new GDC and LDC release announcements, while preparations for two major D community events were underway: the Symmetry Autumn of Code 2021 and DConf Online 2021. We’ll cover it all in this post, with a focus first on the events.

Symmetry Autumn of Code 2021

Symmetry Investments logo

As I write, Symmetry Investments employs in the neighborhood of 180 full-time workers and manages over US$8 billion of capital, and they’re always on the lookout for more employees, including programmers to work with D and other languages. They sponsored DConf 2019 in London and have sponsored the annual Symmetry Autumn of Code since 2018, in which a handful of programmers are paid to work for four months on projects of benefit to the D ecosystem.

This year marks the fourth annual SAoC, and we are now accepting applications. Participants will plan four milestones for projects that benefit the D ecosystem and will be expected to work at least 20 hours per week on each milestone. Each participant will be rewarded US$1000 for the successful completion of each of the first three milestones. At the end of the final milestone, the SAoC committee will review the overall progress of each of the remaining participants. One will be rewarded with a final $US1000 payment and a free pass to the next real-world DConf, with reimbursement for travel and lodging. In last year’s event, a second participant was also awarded a fourth US$1000 payment.

Participation in SAoC has led to jobs for some lucky coders and has generally been a valuable learning experience for those who have completed it. Students currently enrolled in graduate or postgraduate university programs will be given priority, but applications are open to all. The application deadline is August 18th. Project ideas can be found in the D community’s projects repository at GitHub. See the Symmetry Autumn of Code page here at the D Blog for all the details on how to apply as a participant or as a mentor.

DConf Online 2021

For the second consecutive year, we were unable to hold a real-world DConf. Last year we launched the first annual DConf Online. And when I say annual, I mean annual! We’re doing it again this year and will continue to do it going forward even after the real-world DConfs are back on.

DConf Online 2021 will take place November 20 and 21 on the D Language Foundation’s YouTube channel. Once again, we’re looking for pre-recorded talks, livestream panels, and livecoding sessions. If you’d like to propose something in one of those categories, the application deadline is September 5. Please visit the DConf Online 2021 homepage for all the details.

And if you haven’t seen them yet, the DConf Online 2020 and DConf Online 2020 Q & A playlists are available on the same channel. You can also find a full list of talks and all the links (talk videos, slides, and Q & A videos) on the DConf Online 2020 homepage.

New compiler releases

D 2.097.0 is live in the latest release of DMD and the beta release of LDC, the LLVM-based D compiler. The new version of GDC also came into the world as part of GCC 11.1 at the end of April.

DMD 2.097.0

Digital Mars D logo

This version of DMD comes with 29 major changes and 144(!) fixed Bugzilla issues courtesy of 54 contributors. Changes include a few deprecations and several improvements to the standard library. Two things stand out:

  • while(auto n = expression) has been on a few wishlists for a while. Now it’s a reality. The same syntax that was already possible with if statements is considered idiomatic in certain circumstances (such as when checking if an item exists in an associative array). Expect the while condition assignment to start popping up in open-source D projects soon.
  • std.sumtype is another wishlist item that is a wish no more. The new SumType is a replacement for std.variant.Algebraic. It’s a discriminated union that makes good use of Design by Introspection with a nice match syntax for those looking for that sort of thing. It’s been quite a while since the last time a new module was added to the D standard library. Many thanks to Paul Backus for putting in the effort to see it through, and a very big Congratulations!

LDC 1.27.0-beta1

LDC logo

On the same day the new DMD was released, the first beta of LDC 1.27.0, which also supports D 2.097.0, was announced in the D forums.

On top of 2.097.0 support, this version of LDC provides greatly improved DLL support on Windows. The prebuilt Windows packages ship with DRuntime and Phobos DLLs. This is big news for D developers on Windows. We’ve long had issues with D DLLs that have prevented heavy use outside of simple interfaces (with APIs exported as extern(C) being the most reliable).

There are some limitations to be aware of, such as the inability to directly access TLS variables across DLL boundaries (though it’s fine with accessor functions). Please see the release page for the details.

Thanks to Martin Kinkelin and all the LDC maintainers and contributors for their continued work on LDC. They aren’t getting paid for this. If you are a happy LDC user or just like the idea of the project, you can support their work by sponsoring Martin Kinkelin on GitHub.

GDC 11.1

In the GCC world, Iain Buclaw continues to make strides on the GDC compiler.

GDC 11.1 still uses the old C++ version of the D frontend, which feature-wise is mostly (see below) at D 2.076.1. There were significant issues in upstream DMD that prevented Iain from making the switch to the D version of the frontend in time to make the release window. He is currently aiming to make the switch in time for GDC 12. As a consolation, this release has support for three BSDs, Mac OS X, and MinGW!

Despite the older frontend, Iain has backported several fixes and optimizations, and even a few features, so it isn’t your grandfather’s D 2.076.1 that GDC supports. For example, the new bottom type that recently made its way through the D Improvement Proposal review process has found its way into this GDC release. See the forum announcement for details of all the new D goodness in GDC 11.1 and Please consider sponsoring his work on GitHub.

One-off donations

If you aren’t up for sponsoring Martin or Iain but would still like to support them financially, you can make one-time donations through the D Language Foundation. You can send money to the D General Fund, the D Open Collective, or to our PayPal account. Whichever method you choose, please be sure to leave a note that the donation is intended for LDC, GDC, or any D project you would like to support. We’ll make sure the appropriate person receives the money.

Other options for supporting the D programming language: visit the D Language Foundation donation page and donate to one of our funds, head to the DLang Swag Emporium and purchase any items that catch your eye (the D Rocket stuff rocks, and DConf Online 2021 swag will be available shortly), or consider using smile.amazon.com and selecting the D Language Foundation as your charity the next time you shop at Amazon.com (we are only available through the .com domain; browser extensions like SmartAmazonSmile for Firefox and AmazonSmileRedirect for Chrome make it easy to do).

Thanks to everyone who has, will, or continues to support the D programming language, either through donations of time or money. We’ve gotten where we are through community effort, and community effort will keep pushing us forward. D rocks!

A New Year, A New Release of D

Here in DLang Land we’re beginning the new year with a new release of the D reference compiler (DMD) and a beta release of the popular LLVM-based D compiler (LDC). D 2.095.0 is crammed full of 27 major changes and 78 fixes from 61 contributors. Following are some highlights that I expect some D programmers might find interesting, but please see the changelog for the full rundown. Those more interested in Bugzilla issue numbers can jump straight to the bugfix list

D 2.095.0

Digital Mars D logo

D’s support for other programming languages is important for interacting with existing codebases. C ABI compatibility has been strong from the beginning. Support for Objective-C and C++ came later. Though C++-compatibility is a bear to get right, it keeps improving with every compiler release. This release continues that trend and also enhances Objective-C support. We also see a number of QOL (quality-of-life) improvements throughout the compiler, libraries, and tools. DUB, the D build tool and package manager that ships with the compiler (and is also available separately), especially gets a good bit of love in this release.

C++ header generation

For a little while now, DMD has included experimental support for the generation of C++ header files from D source code, via the -CH command-line option, in order to facilitate calling D libraries from C++. For example, given the following D source file:

cpp-ex.d

extern(C++):
struct A {
    int x;
}

void printA(ref A a) {
    import std.stdio : writeln;
    writeln(a);
}

And the following command line:

dmd -HC cpp-ex.d

The compiler outputs the following to stdout (-HCf to specify a file name, and -HCd a directory):

// Automatically generated by Digital Mars D Compiler

#pragma once

#include <assert.h>
#include <stddef.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <math.h>

#ifdef CUSTOM_D_ARRAY_TYPE
#define _d_dynamicArray CUSTOM_D_ARRAY_TYPE
#else
/// Represents a D [] array
template<typename T>
struct _d_dynamicArray
{
    size_t length;
    T *ptr;

    _d_dynamicArray() : length(0), ptr(NULL) { }

    _d_dynamicArray(size_t length_in, T *ptr_in)
        : length(length_in), ptr(ptr_in) { }

    T& operator[](const size_t idx) {
        assert(idx < length);
        return ptr[idx];
    }

    const T& operator[](const size_t idx) const {
        assert(idx < length);
        return ptr[idx];
    }
};
#endif

struct A;

struct A
{
    int32_t x;
    A() :
        x()
    {
    }
};

extern void printA(A& a);

This release brings a number of fixes and improvements to this feature, as can be seen in the changelog. Note that generation of C headers is also supported via -H, -Hf, and -Hd.

Default C++ standard change

Prior to this release, extern(C++) code was guaranteed to link with C++98 binaries out of the box. This is no longer true, and you will need to pass -extern-std=c++98 on the command line to maintain that behavior. The C++11 standard is now the default.

Additionally, the compiler will now accept -extern-std=c++20. In practice, the only effect this has at the moment is to change the compile-time value, __traits(getTargetInfo, "cppStd"), but new types may be added in the future.

Improved Objective-C support

Objective-C compatibility is enhanced in this release with support for Objective-C protocols. This is achieved by repurposing interface in an extern(Objective-C) context. Additionally, the attributes @optional and @selector help get the job done. Read the details and see an example in the changelog.

Improved compile-time feedback

Here’s a QOL issue that really became an annoyance after a deprecation in Phobos, the standard library: when instantiating templates, deprecation messages reported the source location deep inside the library where the deprecated feature was used (e.g., template constraints) and not the user-code instantiation that triggered it. No longer. You’ll now get a template instantiation trace just as you do on errors.

Another QOL feedback issue involved the absence of errors. The compiler would silently allow multiple definitions of identical functions in the same module. The compiler will now raise an error when it encounters this situation. However, multiple declarations are allowed as long as there is at most one definition. For mangling schemes where overloading is not supported (extern(C), extern(Windows), and extern(System)), the compiler will emit a deprecation message.

The mainSourceFile in DUB recipes

The mainSourceFile entry in DUB package recipes was a way to specify a source file containing a main function that should be excluded from unit tests when invoking dub test. However, when setting up other configurations where the file should also not be compiled, or where a different main source file was required, it was necessary to add the file to an excludedSourceFiles entry. This is no longer the case. If a mainSourceFile is specified in any configuration, it will automatically be excluded from other configurations.

Propagating compiler flags to dependencies

Not every existing compiler flag has a corresponding build setting for DUB recipes. The dflags entry allows for such flags to be configured for any project. For example, -fPic, or -preview=in. The catch is, it does not propagate to dependencies. Now, you can explicitly specify compiler flags for dependencies by adding a dflags parameter to any dependency entry in a dub.json recipe. For example:

{
    "name": "example",
    "dependencies": {
        "vibe-d": { "version" : "~>0.9.2", "dflags" : ["-preview=in"] }
    }
}

Unfortunately, it appears the implementation does not work for recipes in SDLang format (dub.sdl), so those of us who prefer that format over JSON will have to wait a bit.

LDC 1.025-beta1

LDC logo

This release of LDC brings the compiler up to date with the D 2.095.0 frontend, with the prebuilt packages based on LLVM v11.0.1. The biggest news in this release looks to be the new -linkonce-templates flag. This experimental feature causes the compiler to emit template symbols into each compilation unit that references them, “with optimizer-discardable linkonce-odr linkage”. The implementation has big wins both in terms of compile times when compiling with optimizations turned on and in cutting down on a class of template-related bugs. See the beta1 release notes for the details.

Happy New Year

On behalf of the D Language Foundation, I wish you all the very best for 2021. As a community, we weren’t affected much by the global pandemic. Sure, we were forced to cancel DConf 2020, but the silver lining is that it also motivated us to finally launch DConf Online in November. We fully intend to make this an annual event alongside of, not in place of, the real-world conference (when physically possible). Other than that, it was business as usual in D Land.

At a personal level, the lives of some in our community were disrupted last year in ways large and small. Please remember that, though the primary object that brings us together is our enthusiasm for the D programming language, we are all still human beings behind our keyboards. The majority of work that gets done in our community is carried out on a volunteer basis. All of us, as the beneficiaries, must never forget that the health and well-being of everyone in our community take top priority over any work we may want or expect to see completed. We encourage everyone to keep an ear open for those who may need to borrow it, and never be afraid to communicate that need when it feels necessary. Sometimes, an open ear can make a very big difference.

Thanks to all of you for your participation in the D community, whether as a user, a contributor, or both. Stay safe, and have a very happy 2021.

D 2.091.0 Released

Digital Mars D logoThe latest release of DMD, the D reference compiler, ships with 18 major changes and 66 bugfixes from 55 contributors. This release contains, among other goodies, improvements to the Windows experience and enhancements to C and C++ interoperability. As fate would have it, the initial release announcement came in the aftermath of some unfortunate news regarding DConf 2020.

DMD on Windows

Over the years, some D users have remarked that the development of D is Linux-centric, that Windows is the black sheep or red-headed stepchild of D platforms. For anyone familiar with D’s early history, that seems an odd thing to say, given that DMD started out as a Windows-only compiler that could only output 32-bit objects in the OMF format. But it’s also understandable, as anyone not familiar with that history could only see that DMD on Windows lagged behind the Linux releases.

64-bit

One place where the official DMD releases on Windows have continued to differ from the releases on other platforms is the lack of 64-bit binaries in the release packages. Again, there’s a historical reason for this. The default output of the compiler is determined by how it is compiled, e.g., 32-bit versions output 32-bit binaries by default. When Walter first added support to DMD for 64-bit output on Windows, it required giving the back end the ability to generate object files in Microsoft’s version of the COFF format and also requiring users to install the Microsoft Build Tools and Platform SDK for access to the MS linker and system link libraries. This is quite a different experience from other platforms, where you can generally expect a common set of build tools to have been installed via the system package manager on any system set up for C and C++ development.

For a Windows developer who chooses GCC for their C and C++ development (or who does no C or C++ development at all), it’s a big ask to require them to download and install several GBs they might not already have installed and probably will never use for anything else. So D releases on Windows continued to ship with 32-bit binaries and the OPTLINK linker in order to provide a minimum out-of-the-box experience. That was a perfectly fine solution, unless you happened to be someone who really wanted 64-bit output (posts from disgruntled Windows users who didn’t want to install the MS tools can be found sprinkled throughout the forum archives).

Eventually, the LLVM linker (LLD) was added to the DMD Windows release packages, along with system link libraries generated from the MinGW definitions. This allowed users to compile 64-bit output out of the box and, once the kinks were worked out, eliminated the dependency on the MS linker. Yet, the official release packages still did not include a 64-bit version of DMD and still did not support 64-bit output by default.

With DMD 2.091.0, the black sheep has come back into the fold. The official DMD releases on Windows now ship with 64-bit binaries, so those of you masochists out there who cling to Makefiles and custom build scripts can expect the default output be what you expect it to be (for the record, DUB, the build tool and package manager that ships with DMD, has been instructing the compiler to compile 64-bit output by default on 64-bit systems for the past few releases).

Windows gets even more love

There are lots of goodies for Windows in this release. Another biggie is that DMD is now 30-40% faster on Windows. It’s no secret that LDC, the LLVM-based D compiler, generates faster binaries than DMD (for some D users, the general rule of thumb is to develop with DMD for its fast compile times and release with LDC for its faster binaries, though others argue that LDC is plenty fast for development and DMD is fine for production). There have been requests for some time to stop compiling DMD with DMD and start doing it with LDC instead. This release is the first to put that into practice.

There are a number of smaller enhancements to the Windows experience: the install.sh script available on the DMD downloads page that some people prefer now supports POSIX environments on Windows; the system link libraries that ship with the compiler have been upgraded from MinGW  5.0.2 to 7.0.0; LLD has been upgraded to 9.0.0; and there’s plenty more in the changelog.

C++ Header Generation

With just about every major release of DMD, D’s interoperability with C and C++ sees some kind of improvement. This release brings a huge one.

Over the years, some have speculated that it would be excellent if the D compiler could generate headers for C and C++ for D libraries intended to be usable in C or C++ programs. Now that wishful thinking has become a(n experimental) reality. Given a set of extern(C) or extern(C++) functions, DMD can generate header files that contain the appropriate C or C++ declarations. Three compiler switches get the job done:

  • -HC will cause the header to be generated and printed to standard output
  • -HCf=fileName will cause the header to be generated and printed to the specified file
  • -HCd=directoryname will (once it’s implemented) cause the header to be printed to a file in the specified directory

See the changelog for example output.

Other News

While the Corona virus was initially ramping up out of sight from most of the world, plans for DConf 2020 were ramping up online from different locations around the world. Planning began in November, the venue was secured in late December, and the website launched with the announcement in early January.

As news of the virus outbreak spread, the conference organizers grew concerned. Would we be okay in June? In late February, that concern manifested as a discussion of possible contingency plans. Two weeks later, it resulted in the decision to cancel DConf 2020. Thankfully, the D community has been supportive of the decision.

As part of the discussion of contingency plans, the possibility was raised of hosting an online conference. The idea of course came up in the discussion of the cancellation in the forums, and a few people reached out shortly after the initial announcement offering to provide help in setting something up. Walter created a forum thread to discuss the topic for anyone interested.

No one involved with organizing DConf has any experience with hosting an online conference. We’re currently exploring options and looking at what the organizers of other Conferences in the Time of COVID-19 are doing. We want to do it, and we want to do it well. Experience with organizing DConf in the real world has taught us not to jump on any old technology without first having a fallback (ahem, DConf 2018 livestream) and making sure the tech does what we expect it to (ahem, DConf 2019 livestream). So don’t expect a quick announcement. We want to find the right tech that fits our requirements and explore how it works before we move forward with setting dates. But do expect that DConf 2020 Online is looking more and more likely to become a thing.

Recent D Compiler Releases

Digital Mars D logoThe LDC team closed out the old year with release 1.19.0 of the LLVM-based D compiler, and the core D team opened the new year with version 2.090.0 of the reference D compiler, DMD. And if you haven’t yet heard, there was some big news about the GCC-based D compiler, GDC, a while back. Time to catch up!

LDC 1.19.0

This release updates the LDC compiler to D front end version 2.089.1, which was the current version when the compiler was released on the day after Christmas. The prebuilt packages are based on LLVM 9.01.

Among the big items in this release is some love for Android. The prebuilt DRuntime/Phobos library is now available for all supported Android targets. This release can be used in conjunction with Adam Ruppe’s D Android project, a collection of helper programs and interfaces, currently in beta, to facilitate D development on Android with LDC.

Windows users will find that the bundled MinGW-based link libraries for Windows development have been upgraded. They are now derived from .def files from the MinGW-w64 7.0.0 package. These libraries allow you to use the Windows system libraries without needing to install the Windows SDK.

DMD 2.090.0

The latest version of DMD was announced on January 7th. It ships with 10 major changes and 71 closed issues courtesy of 48 contributors.

With this release, it’s now possible to do more with lazy parameters. D has long supported lazy parameters:

An argument to a lazy parameter is not evaluated before the function is called. The argument is only evaluated if/when the parameter is evaluated within the function. Hence, a lazy argument can be executed 0 or more times.

Under the hood, they are implemented as delegates. Now, it’s possible to get at the underlying delegate by taking the address of the parameter, an operation which was previously illegal.

import std.stdio;

void chillax(lazy int x)
{
    auto dg = &x;
    assert(dg() == 10);
    writeln(x);
}

void main()
{
    chillax(2 * 5);
}

This release also renders obsolete a D idiom used by those who find themselves with a need to distinguish between finalization (non-deterministic object destruction usually initiated by the garbage collector) and normal destruction (deterministic object destruction) from inside a class or struct destructor.

With the current GC implementation, it’s illegal to perform some GC operations during finalization. However, D does not provide for separate finalizers and destructors. There is only ~this, which is referred to as a destructor even though it fills both roles. This sometimes presents difficulties when implementing destructors for types that are intended to be used with both GC and non-GC allocation. Any cleanup activity that touches the GC could throw an InvalidMemoryOperationError. Hence the need for the aforementioned workaround.

Now it’s possible to call the static GC member function, core.memory.GC.inFinalizer, to get your bearings in a destructor. It returns true if the current thread is performing object finalization, in which case you don’t want to be taking any actions that touch on GC operations. (I’ve been waiting for something like this before writing the next article in my GC series.)

GDC

Thanks to the hard work of Iain Buclaw, Johannes Pfau, and all of the volunteers who have maintained and contributed to it over the years, GDC was accepted into GCC 9 in late 2018 and made available as part of the GCC 9.1 package released in May of last year. GCC 9.2 was released last August. This version of GDC implements version 2.076 of the D front end. You can build it yourself or install it from the same place you install the GCC 9.x series.

DMD 2.089.0 Released

Digital Mars logoThe latest release of DMD, the D reference compiler, is ready for download. It’s a relatively light release in terms of changes and features, with 11 major changes and 66 closed Bugzilla issues. Most of the changes cover narrow use cases. To highlight a few: proper non-D mangling in template mixins, a renamed default linker, and expanded support in DUB for LDC.

Proper non-D mangling in template mixins

Maintainers of C bindings, or anyone writing D programs that need to interface with a custom C codebase, may find this change particularly useful. Previously, symbols declared as extern(C), extern(Windows)(which is stdcall), and extern(Objective-C) in template mixins were improperly mangled as D symbols when the templates were mixed in at global scope. It was easy to work around if you didn’t need parameterization (just use string mixins), but if you did need it, then you were either stuck or had to jump through hoops.

The root of the issue was that a template mixin introduces a new scope at the point it’s mixed in and creates aliases to the declarations inside that scope so that they may be accessed externally without the need for dot notation. This is a major convenience when only one instance of the template is mixed into a scope (as is the usual case) and allows for code to be written as if the template mixin doesn’t exist. In other words:

mixin template Foo(T)
{
    T x;
}

mixin Foo;

// Not required
// mixin Foo f;

// Allows this:
int main()
{
    x = 10;

    // Not required
    // f.x = 10;
}

The additional scope meant that, e.g., an extern(C) symbol in a template mixin was never in global scope, so it was mangled as a D symbol rather than a C symbol. With the change, such symbols are promoted from the mixin scope to the global scope and are properly mangled. Now you can choose either string mixins or template mixins for your C/stdcall /Objective-C boilerplate.

No more link.exe conflict

From the first alpha release of DMD, OPTLINK has been the default linker that ships with the compiler on Windows. When Walter Bright first started working on DMD, he used the existing C compiler backend he had been maintaining for 20 years. Since the backend already output object files in the Intel OMF format, he also decided to make use of OPTLINK; it had become a part of the C and C++ compiler package while he was at Borland. It was several years later that he added support Microsoft’s MSCOFF (PE) and the Microsoft linker, cl, to DMD. The fact that both the OPTLINK and cl executables were named link.exe wasn’t an issue early on, but over time it has begun to pop up more often, particularly when performing the compile and link steps separately.

With DMD 2.089, it will never be an issue again. The version of OPTLINK that ships with DMD has been renamed to optlink.exe.

DUB and LDC

DUB, the D build tool and package manager, has shipped with DMD for several releases. When executing dub on a properly configured source package, DMD is the default compiler. It also supports LDC (the LLVM-based D compiler) and GDC (the GCC-based D compiler, which is part of GCC 9) via command-line options, but the full range of DUB features haven’t been available for those compilers.

The latest version improves support for LDC. DUB command-line options to enable code coverage, profiling, keeping the stack frame, and separate linking now work with LDC. Target triples can be given to the --architecture (-a) switch to enable cross-compilation with LDC.

DMD 2.088.0 Released

Digital Mars logoThe newest DMD has rolled off the assembly line and is ready for download. A total of 58 contributors fixed 58 bugs and introduced 27 major changes to version 2.088.0 of the compiler.

I’m always looking for the big ticket items in a new DMD release to highlight on the blog, but this is a workaday release that isn’t showing off anything too shiny in the changleog. Much of it is run-of-the mill maintenance: deprecations, removals, and behavior adjustments. All of that is important, and we all welcome it, but it doesn’t make for great reading on the blog. That said, there are a handful of useful additions that I can point to, one of which actually is a big deal when it comes to C++ interop.

std::string and std::vector

Thanks to the work Manu Evans has been performing and advocating, C++ interoperability gets a big boost in this release with bindings to std::string and std::vector in the DRuntime modules core.stdcpp.string and core.stdcpp.vector, respectively.  There’s one caveat with the std::string binding that anyone intending to use it must be aware of.

When compiling on Linux, where DMD makes use of the GCC libraries and linker, there’s a compatibility issue when using the modern version of std::string which is compliant with C++11. It contains an interior pointer, which in D is both illegal and incompatible with move semantics. The work around is to pass -D_GLIBCXX_USE_CXX11_ABI=0 to g++ and compile your D application with -version=_GLIBCXX_USE_CXX98_ABI. This will be resolved in the future when work on move constructors in D is complete.

New Utilities

The language gets an interesting new compile-time trait in the form of getLocation. Given a symbol, this trait will return a tuple containing the file name, line number, and column number at which the symbol appears in the source code. This opens the door to more informative debug logging and error reporting beyond the functionality already available via __FILE__ and __LINE__. And I’m sure folks will find other uses for it.

The standard library utility module std.file, which provides a lot of convenience functions for working with files as a unit, now has the new function getAvailableDiskSpace. Give it a directory path on Windows, or the path to a directory or file on Posix, and it will give you the number of bytes available on that path.

Other News

The Symmetry Autumn of Code 2019 participants all have mentors now and they are hard at work laying out their milestones. Milestone 1 officially kicks off on September 15, after which we can expect to see weekly updates from the participants in the General forum.

Google Summer of Code 2019 has come to an end. Five of our students submitted their work at the end of August. You can find information about their projects and view their code submissions from our GSOC projects page. Congratulations to all who participated!

The D Language Foundation is currently in discussions to put some of the Human Resource Fund to use in finalizing LDC support for iOS and Android. Hopefully, I’ll have details to report on that front in the very near future. In the meantime, please help us raise the HR Fund even higher than it is now. There’s some important work waiting to be done that will require as much money as we can throw at it. You can donate any amount directly to the HR Fund Campaign or use the special campaign we set up to send $60 to the HR Fund and get a DConf 2019 t-shirt in return.

Speaking of t-shirts, thanks to everyone who has made a purchase in our DLang Swag Emporium. You’ve helped us raise over $77 so far, all of which will go to the General Fund. If you haven’t yet dropped in, what are you waiting for? We’ve got t-shirts, stickers, and coffee mugs, with updates coming soon. It’s an easy way to support our favorite programming language!

 

DMD 2.087.0 Released

Digital Mars logoThe latest release of the Digital Mars D compiler (DMD) is now available. Version 2.087.0 marks 44 closed Bugzilla issues and 22 major changes courtesy of 63 contributors. See the changelog for the details and related links. Visit the Digital Mars Downloads page to get the release package for your platform(s).

One of the changes in this release is the end of a transitional period regarding imports, another involves a certain compiler switch and the compilation of Phobos. There’s also something developers on Windows will find useful, and more options for documenting code with Ddoc.

Endings and beginnings

Once upon a time, two related compiler issues were reported in the D bug tracker, where they remained for years beyond measure (it was actually just shy of a decade). These bugs allowed symbols to sometimes be accessed inside a scope in which they weren’t supposed to be visible. Eventually, once the bugs were fixed, two switches were introduced to help users maintain their existing code: -transtion=import caused the code to compile under the old, incorrect behavior, and -transition=checkimport would report on all occurences of the erroneous behavior in a code base. Steven Schveighoffer did a write up about it all on his blog at the time, which is a good read for anyone interested in the details.

In DMD 2.087.0, the transitional period is over. The -transition=import and -transition=checkimports switches no longer have any effect. Henceforth, if you have any existing code you’ve been compiling with -transition=import, your code will break with the new release if you are still relying on the old buggy behavior.

As one period ends, another begins. A new deprecation will give you warnings if you are initializing immutable global data via a static constructor like so:

immutable int bar;
static this()
{
    bar = 42;
}

This behavior is deprecated. Static constructors and destructors are called once per thread. Given that immutable global data is implicitly shared across threads rather than being thread-local like normal D variables, data like bar would be overwritten every time a new thread is spawned. The fix is to ensure that the static constructor is also shared across threads:

immutable int bar;
shared static this()
{
    bar = 42;
}

Static constructors and destructors marked shared are invoked once per process rather than once per thread.

DIP 1000 and Phobos

DIP 1000 was the first D Improvement Proposal submitted after the DIP process was transformed from an informal, wiki-based approach, to a formal, managed approach with structured review periods. It proposed a feature called “Scoped Pointers” intended to “provide a mechanism to guarantee that a reference cannot escape lexical scope”. Unfortunately, the document itself remained in a sort of limbo as the proposed feature was implemented and evolved. Eventually, the implementation diverged from the proposal to such a degree that the DIP was marked as Superseded and retired. But not the feature!

The -preview=dip1000 flag has been available for some time now, but it has been a bit tricky to use given that the standard library could not be compiled with it. With DMD 2.087.0, that is true no more. Phobos now compiles with -preview=dip1000 and D programmers can now more easily make use of the feature.

Given that this is still in preview mode and hasn’t yet seen enough wide-spread use, please don’t be surprised if you uncover any bugs. Please do report any bugs you find to the issue tracker so that they can be squashed as soon as possible.

Explicitly choose the LLD linker on Windows

From the beginning, DMD shipped with self-contained support for 32-bit development on Windows. This was possible because Walter Bright made use of the existing platform libraries and linker (OPTLINK) that he was already shipping with his Digital Mars C and C++ compiler. Unfortunately, OPTLINK only supports the OMF object format, so the output of DMD on Windows was incompatible with the greater Windows ecosystem which is primarily built around the PE COFF output (see this PDF of the specification) of the Microsoft build tools. PE COFF, known as MSCOFF in the D universe, is a Microsoft-specific version of the COFF format.

Eventually, Walter added MSCOFF support to DMD for 64-bit (and later, 32-bit) development, but that required that developers have the Microsoft linker and platform libraries installed. In the past, that meant installing either Visual Studio or the Microsoft Build Tools package along with the Windows SDK. In recent years, installing Visual Studio Community edition would provide everything necessary. When compiling with -m64 or -m32mscoff, OPTLINK would be ignored in favor of the Microsoft linker.

With the release of DMD 2.079.0, the compiler began shipping with the LLVM linker (LLD), a set of platform libraries derived from those that ship with the MinGW compiler, and a wrapper library for the Visual C++ 2010 runtime. From that point forward, when given -m64 or -m32mscoff on Windows, the compiler would search for the Microsoft installation and, if not found, fallback on the bundled linker and libraries if they were installed. For the first time, DMD had self-contained 64-bit output on Windows. (Interestingly, it’s never been self-contained on other platforms, where DMD relies on the system linker and libraries, the presence of which is a given and not a source of complaint as the dependence on the MS linker has been.)

Now that the new set up has been put through its paces for a while and some of the kinks have been ironed out, DMD 2.087.0 makes it possible to explicitly select the bundled MSCOFF import libraries and LLD linker via the command line switch -mscrtlib=msvcrt100.

Markdown support in Ddoc

Ddoc was originally designed as a macro-based system for documenting source code, but its use has expanded beyond that scenario in the years since. Most sections of the dlang.org website are created with Ddoc, as is the dconf.org site. Ali Çehreli used it to write his book, Programming in D.

Support for Markdown-like syntax has been requested now and again in the forums. Now that’s available in DMD 2.087. It’s currently in preview mode, so it requires the -preview=markdown flag. There are some differences from the other flavors of Markdown you may be familiar with, so be sure to read the list of supported features before putting it to use.

Supporting the development of D

Much of the blood, sweat, and tears that went into this and every release of the compiler was provided by volunteers. They do the work they can within the constraints of their knowledge, skills, experience and, the mother of all limiters, time. There are some tasks that have yet to fit within the bounds of any volunteer’s constraints. These will require dedicated effort to strike off the list.

To that end, I’d like to remind everyone that we are raising money for a Human Resource Fund that we will use to bring in some folks specifically to tackle these difficult tasks. WekaIO seeded the fund with a generous contribution and a few of our community members have thrown some of their own resources into the pot with the gratitude of the D Language Foundation.

But we need more! We still have DConf 2019 t-shirts for anyone who wants to throw $60 at the HR fund, as well as DMan shirts and DConf 2020 registration discounts for those able and willing to donate more. See my recent blog post on the topic for details to make sure you donate to the correct campaign in order to get the shirt you want.

Another reminder: if you want to become a Gold Donor or Personal Sponsor on our Open Collective page (which is separate from the HR Fund – again, read my recent blog post to avoid confusion), please either ensure your email address is included in your profile or contact me directly to let me know who you are. Otherwise, I can’t send you a DMan shirt!

DMD 2.085.0 and DConf 2019 News

Coinciding with news of a new release of DMD is news about DConf 2019 in London. From new GC options in DRuntime to free beers and free tours at DConf, we may as well kill two birds with one blog post!

Compiler news

The 2.085.0 release of DMD, the D reference compiler, is now ready for download. Among other things, this release sees support for 32-bit OS X removed, more support for interfacing with Objective-C, and big news on the garbage collection front. There’s also been some work on compatibility with the standard C++ library. In total, 2.085.0 represents 58 closed Bugzilla issues and the efforts of 49 contributors. See the changelog for the full details.

Interfacing with Objective-C

DMD has had limited support for binding with Objective-C for some time. This release expands that support to include classes, instance variables, and super calls.

Previously, binding with Objective-C classes required using D interfaces. No longer. Now, Objective-C classes can be declared directly as D classes. Decorate an Objective-C class with extern(Objective-C), make use of the @selector attribute on the methods, and away you go.

To better facilitate interaction between the two languages, such classes have slightly modified behavior. Any static and final methods in an extern(Objective-C) class are virtual. However, final methods still are forbidden from being overridden by subclasses. static methods are overridable.

extern (Objective-C)
class NSObject
{
    static NSObject alloc() @selector("alloc");
    NSObject init() @selector("init");
    void release() @selector("release");
}

extern (Objective-C)
class Foo : NSObject
{
    override static Foo alloc() @selector("alloc");
    override Foo init() @selector("init");

    int bar(int a) @selector("bar:")
    {
        return a;
    }
}

void main()
{
    auto foo = Foo.alloc.init;
    scope (exit) foo.release();

    assert(foo.bar(3) == 3);
}

It’s also now possible to declare instance variables in Objective-C classes and for a method in an Objective-C class to make a super call.

extern (Objective-C)
class NSObject
{
    void release() @selector("release");
}

extern (Objective-C)
class Foo : NSObject
{
    // instance variable
    int bar;

    int foo() @selector("foo")
    {
        return 3;
    }

    int getBar() @selector("getBar")
    {
        return bar;
    }
}

extern (Objective-C)
class Bar : Foo
{
    static Bar alloc() @selector("alloc");
    Bar init() @selector("init");

    override int foo() @selector("foo")
    {
        // super call
        return super.foo() + 1;
    }
}

New GC stuff

Perhaps the biggest of the GC news items is that DRuntime now ships with a precise garbage collector. This can be enabled on any executable compiled and linked against the latest DRuntime by passing the runtime option --DRT-gcopt=gc:precise. To be clear, this is not a DMD compiler option. Read the documentation on the precise GC for more info.

Another new GC configuration option controls the behavior of the GC at program termination. Currently, the GC runs a collection at termination. This is to present the opportunity to finalize any live objects still holding on to resources that might affect the system state. However, this doesn’t guarantee all objects will be finalized as roots may still exist, nor is the need for it very common, so it’s often just a waste of time. As such, a new cleanup option allows the user of a D program to specify three possible approaches to GC clean up at program termination:

  • collect: the default, current, behavior for backward compatibility
  • none: do no cleanup at all
  • finalize: unconditionally finalize all live objects

This can be passed on the command line of a program compiled and linked against DRuntime as, e.g. --DRT-gcopt=cleanup:finalize.

All DRuntime options, including the two new ones, can be set up in code rather than being passed on the command line by declaring and initializing an array of strings called rt_options. It must be both extern(C) and __gshared:

extern(C) __gshared string[] rt_options = ["gcopt=gc:precise cleanup:none"];

See the documentation on configuring the garbage collector for more GC options.

Additional GC-related enhancements include programmatic access to GC profiling statistics and a new GC registry that allows user-supplied GCs to be linked with the runtime (see the documentation for details).

Standard C++

There are two enhancements to D’s C++ interface in this release. The first is found in the new DRuntime module, core.stdcpp.new_. This provides access to the global C++ new and delete operators so that D programs can allocate from the C++ heap. The second is the new core.stdcpp.allocator module, which exposes the std::allocator<T> class of C++ as a foundation for binding to the STL container types that allocate.

DConf 2019 news

There are two interesting perks for conference goers this year.

The nightly gathering spot

We now have an “official” gathering spot. Usually at DConf, we pick an “official” hotel where the D Language Foundation folks and many attendees stay, but where a number of conference goers gather in the evenings after dinner. This year, a number of factors made it difficult to pick a reasonable spot, so we opted for something different.

There’s a cozy little pub around the corner from the venue, the Prince Arthur, that has a nice room on the second floor available for reservation. There’s a limit on how many bodies we can pack in there at once, but folks generally come and go throughout the evening anyway. Any overflow can head downstairs to the public area. We’ve got the room May 8, 9, and 10.

Additionally, we’ll be offering a couple of free rounds each night courtesy of Mercedes-Benz Research & Development North America. Free drinks in a cozy backstreet London pub sounds like a great way to pass the time!

Check out the DConf venue page for details about the Prince Arthur and how to get there.

A free tour by Joolz Guides

Julian McDonnell of Joolz Guides will be taking some DConf registrants on a guided walk May 6 and 7. If you’ve never seen his YouTube channel, we recommend it. His video guides are quirky, informative, and fun.

This is available for free to all registrants, but space is limited! When you register for DConf, you’ll receive information on how to reserve your spot. We’ve arranged to have the tours in the mid-afternoon on both days so that folks arriving in the morning will have a chance to participate. This is a walking tour that will last somewhere between 3 – 4 hours, so be sure to wear comfortable shoes.

The current plan is to start at Temple Station and end at London Bridge. We hope you join us!

Deadlines

The DConf submission deadline of March 10 is just around the corner. Now’s the time to send in your proposal for a talk, demo, panel or research report. See the DConf 2019 homepage for submission guidelines and selection criteria. And remember, speakers are eligible for reimbursement of travel and accommodation expenses.

The early-bird registration deadline of March 17 is fast approaching. Register now to take advantage of the 15% discount!

DMD 2.084.0 Has Arrived

The D Language Foundation is pleased to present version 2.084.0 of DMD, the reference D compiler. It’s available for download at dlang.org, where you can also find the full changelog. There are a few changes and new features to be found, as usual, along with 100 closed Bugzilla issues this time around.

Finer Control Over Run-time Checks

The new compiler flag -check is a feature that grew out of DIP 1006 and some internal discussions around its content. The flag allows overriding the default behavior of six specific categories of run-time checks by specifically turning them on or off:

  • assert – assertion checks
  • bounds – bounds checks
  • inin contracts
  • invariant – class and struct invariants
  • outout contracts
  • switch – default switch cases

For example, when compiling without -release, all run-time checks are enabled by default. To disable only assertion checks:

dmd -check=assert=off foo.d

This can be further refined with the new -checkaction flag, which determines how the program will respond when an assertion, bounds, or switch check fails. There are four options: D, C, and halt.

  • D – the default D behavior, which is to throw an Error to indicate an unrecoverable condition.
  • C – behave as a C program by calling the assertion failure function in the C runtime.
  • halt – execute a halt instruction to terminate the program.

Listed in the language documentation is a fourth option: context. This causes failed checks to throw an Error to indicate an unrecoverable condition, and also print the error context. It isn’t present in this release, but is coming in DMD 2.085 (the online documentation is generated from the DMD master branch).

Save Your Mixins

One of D’s most popular and powerful features is the mixin statement, commonly referred to as string mixins to avoid confusion with template mixins. Unfortunately, given that string mixins can be composed from multiple compile-time function calls, they are also notoriously painful to debug as they grow in complexity. The new -mixin compiler option aims to do away with that pain.

Consider the following simple (contrived) example, which attempts to generate a function call with a string mixin:

import std.stdio;

void hello() { writeln("Hello!"); }

void main() {
    mixin(hello.stringof ~ "();");
}

Save as hello.d, compile with dmd hello, and you’ll see an error along these lines:

hello.d-mixin-6(6): Error: function expected before (), not hello() of type void

The error does say exactly what the problem is, but even in this simple case it may require re-reading the message a few times before working out what it’s actually saying. So let’s recompile with the -mixin flag. It requires a file name. I’ve selected mixed.txt:

dmd -mixin=mixed.txt hello.d

Now we see this output:

mixed.txt(110): Error: function expected before (), not hello() of type void

See the difference? The error now refers to a line number in a file with the name we provided, rather than a line in the autogenerated hello.d-mixin-6 to which we couldn’t refer. Open mixed.txt and navigate to line 110 to find the generated code, along with a comment at line 109:

// expansion at foo.d(6)
hello()();

And now the error is quite clear. Invoking .stringof on a function provides you with the function name including the parentheses, so there’s no need to append parentheses to the result. We can now change the example so that it will compile:

void main() {
    mixin(hello.stringof ~ ";");
}

Anyone making significant use of string mixins to generate code will undoubtedly find this feature useful. It will be particularly helpful for the maintainers of D-friendly IDEs and plugins to make the user experience more convenient.

New DUB features

DMD 2.084.0 ships with version 1.13.0 of DUB, the D build tool and package manager. It gets some new goodies with this release.

The new add command is a convenience to add dependencies to a project’s package recipe. No need to worry about the syntax and whether the recipe is written using JSON or SDLang. Simply run dub with the add command, specifying one or more dub packages, and the recipe will be modified accordingly. For example, to add the BindBC bindings for the GLFW and OpenGL C libraries:

dub add bindbc-glfw bindbc-opengl

This will add the latest version of each library. This can be restricted to a specific version by appending = to the package name along with the normal DUB syntax for version specifications. This can also be used to change the version specification of an existing dependency.

For those unfamiliar with DUB, executing dub run, or simply dub, in a directory containing a dub recipe will build a project according to the recipe and, if the project is an executable, run it once the build completes. Now, there are two new recipe directives that can be used to achieve more specialized goals. preRunCommands specifies commands to execute before the DUB target is run, and postRunCommands specifies commands to execute when the run is complete. See the DUB package recipe documentation for the JSON syntax or the SDLang syntax, under “Build Settings” in each, to see what they look like.

That’s Not All

Regarding the 100 closed Bugzilla issues, two points should be made.

First is that among many of the Pull Request merges that closed those issues, you’ll find Nicholas Wilson’s GitHub handle. Nicholas is, of course, the community member the D Language Foundation asked to serve as PR Manager, to be paid through a fundraising campaign. He’s been reviving old PRs and making sure new ones don’t go stale. This release is evidence that the initiative is paying off. And the icing on the cake is that the D community enabled us to meet our fundraising target well before our February 14th deadline. Thanks!

Second, a point relevant to the #dbugfix campaign. While I was disappointed that participation in nominating Bugzilla issues on Twitter and in the Forums dwindled to near zero, the previous nominations were not forgotten. The original goal was to fix at least two nominated issues per cycle, so several nominated bugs were never selected. However, thanks to Eduard Staniloiu and Razvan Nitu, two among that group are now closed and fixed in this release:

I’m still happy to take #dbugfix nominations. If you’ve got a Bugzilla issue that’s bugging you, tweet a link to it with #dbugfix in the text, or start a thread in the General forum with #dbugfix in the title. I’ll make a note of it and, rather than counting votes and selecting two of the top five, see if I can find someone to do something about it.