A Look at Chapel, D, and Julia Using Kernel Matrix Calculations

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Introduction It seems each time you turn around there is a new programming language aimed at solving some specific problem set. Increased proliferation of programming languages and data are deeply connected in a fundamental way, and increasing demand for “data science” computing is a related phenomenon. In the field of scientific computing, Chapel, D, and … Continue reading A Look at Chapel, D, and Julia Using Kernel Matrix Calculations

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Lomuto’s Comeback

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The Continental Club in Austin, Texas, USA Sunday, January 5, 1987 “Thank you for your kind invitation, Mr. Lomuto. I will soon return to England so this is quite timely.” “And thanks for agreeing to meeting me, Mister… Sir… Charles… A.R… Hoare. It’s a great honor. I don’t even know how to address you. Were … Continue reading Lomuto’s Comeback

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Interfacing D with C: Arrays and Functions (Arrays Part 2)

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This post is part of an ongoing series on working with both D and C in the same project. The previous post explored the differences in array declaration and initialization. This post takes the next step: declaring and calling C functions that take arrays as parameters. Arrays and C function declarations Using C libraries in … Continue reading Interfacing D with C: Arrays and Functions (Arrays Part 2)

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DustMite: The General-Purpose Data Reduction Tool

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If you’ve been around for a while, or are a particularly adventurous developer who enjoys mixing language features in interesting ways, you may have run into one compiler bug or two: Implementation bugs are inevitably a part of using cutting-edge programming languages. Should you run into one, the steps to proceed are generally as follows: … Continue reading DustMite: The General-Purpose Data Reduction Tool

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D 2.091.0 Released

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The latest release of DMD, the D reference compiler, ships with 18 major changes and 66 bugfixes from 55 contributors. This release contains, among other goodies, improvements to the Windows experience and enhancements to C and C++ interoperability. As fate would have it, the initial release announcement came in the aftermath of some unfortunate news … Continue reading D 2.091.0 Released

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Tracing D Applications

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At one time or another during application development you need to make a decision: does your application work like it should and, if not, what is wrong with it? There are different techniques to help you decide, some of which are logging, tracing, and profiling. How are they different? One way to look at it … Continue reading Tracing D Applications

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News Update: Swag, Platforms, Documentation Help and More

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Here are a few updates on things that have been going on both in front of and behind the scenes of the D Programming Language community. New D Swag We’ve got some new items in the DLang Swag Emporium: t-shirts, coffee mugs, and stickers sporting the Royal D logo. (If all Royal D items aren’t … Continue reading News Update: Swag, Platforms, Documentation Help and More

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DConf 2020: Submission Deadline, Early-Bird Registration, and Invited Keynote

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In early January, I announced that Symmetry Investments is bringing DConf back to London for our 2020 edition. At the same time, I said we’d start taking submissions from anyone who wanted to send them in. In the interim, we’ve fixed our deadlines and prepared to start accepting reservations. There was only one thing remaining … Continue reading DConf 2020: Submission Deadline, Early-Bird Registration, and Invited Keynote

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wc in D: 712 Characters Without a Single Branch

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After reading “Beating C With 80 Lines Of Haskell: Wc”, which I found on Hacker News, I thought D could do better. So I wrote a wc in D. The Program It consists of one file and has 34 lines and 712 characters. import std.stdio : writefln, File; import std.algorithm : map, fold, splitter; import … Continue reading wc in D: 712 Characters Without a Single Branch

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D For Data Science: Calling R from D

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D is a good language for data science. The advantages include a pleasant syntax, interoperability with C (in many cases as simple as adding an #include directive to import a C header file via the dpp tool), C-like speed, a large standard library, static typing, built-in unit tests and documentation generation, and a garbage collector … Continue reading D For Data Science: Calling R from D

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