Introspection, Introspection Everywhere

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Prelude: Orem, UT, May 29 2015

Just finished delivering my keynote. Exiting the character, I’m half dead. People say it needs to look easy. Yeah, just get up there and start saying things. Like it’s natural. Spontaneous. Not for me it’s not. Weeks before any public talk, I can only think of how to handle it. What to say. What angles come up. The questions. The little jokes made in real time. Being consistently spontaneous requires so much rehearsal. The irony.

So all I want now is sneak into my hotel room. Replenish the inner introvert after the ultimate act of extroversion. Lay on the bed thinking “What the heck was that?” for the rest of the day. Bit of slalom to get to the door. Almost there. In the hallway, an animated gentleman talks to a few others. He sports a shaved head and a pair of eyebrows that just won’t quit. Stands just by the door, notices me in the corner of his eye, and it’s instantly clear to both of us he’s waiting for me. Still, he delicately gives me the chance to pretend I didn’t notice and walk around him. “Hi, I’m Andrei.” “Liran, co-founder and CTO of Weka.IO. I’m leaving a bit early and before that I wanted to tell you—you should come visit us in Tel Aviv. We’ve been using D for a year now in a large system. I think you’ll like what you see. I might also arrange you a Google tech talk and visits at a couple of universities. Think it over.”

Tel Aviv, May 8 2017

Coming out of the hotel, heat hits like a punch. We’re talking 41 Celsius (before you pull that calculator: 106 Fahrenheit), if you’re lucky to be in the shade. Zohar, software engineer and factotum extraordinaire at Weka, is driving us on the busy streets of Tel Aviv to his employer’s headquarters. A fascinating exotic place, so far away from my neck of the woods.

First, Liran gives me an overview of their system—a large-scale distributed storage based on flash memory. Not my specialty, so I’m desperately searching my mind for trick questions—Information Theory—wait! peeps a lonely neuron who hasn’t fired since 1993—Reed-Solomon and friends, used to know about it. (Loved that class. The professor was quite a character. Wrote anticommunist samizdat poetry before it was cool. Or even legal. True story.) “How do you deal with data corruption when you have such a low write amplification?” “Glad you asked!” (It’s actually me who’s glad. Yay, I didn’t ask a stupid question.) “We use a redundant encoding with error correction properties; you get to choose the trade-off between redundancy and failure tolerance. At any rate, blind data duplication is mathematically a gross thing to do.” I ask a bunch more questions, and clearly these guys did their homework. The numbers look impressive, too—they beat specialized hardware at virtually all metrics. “What’s the trick?” I finally ask. Liran smiles. “I get that all the time. There’s not one trick. There’s a thousand carefully motivated, principled things we do, from the high level math down to the machine code in the drivers. The trick is to do everything right.”

We now need to hop to my first stop of the tour—Tel Aviv University. Liran accompanies me, partly to see his alma mater after twenty years. Small, intimate audience; it’s the regular meeting of their programming languages research group. A few graduate students, a postdoc, and a couple of professors. The talk goes over smoothly. We get to spend five whole minutes on an oddball—what’s the role of the two semicolons in here?

mixin(op ~ "payload;");

It’s tricky. mixin is a statement so it needs a terminator, hence the semicolon at the very end. In turn, mixin takes a string (the concatenation of variable op, which in this case happens to be either "++" or "--", and "payload;") and passes it to the compiler as a statement. Mix this string in the code, so to say. It follows that the string ultimately compiled is "++payload;" or "--payload;". The trick is the generated statement needs its own semicolon. However, within an expression context, mixin is an expression so no more need for the additional semicolon:

auto x = mixin(op ~ "payload"); // mixin is an expression here, no semicolon!

This seems to leave one researcher a bit unhappy, but I point out that all macro systems have their oddities. He agrees and the meeting ends on a cordial note.

The evening ends with dinner and beers with engineers at Weka. The place is called “Truck Deluxe” and it features an actual food truck parked inside the restaurant. We discuss a million things. I am so galvanized I can only sleep for four hours.

May 9 2017

Omg omg OMG. The alarm clock rings at 6:50 AM, and then again at 7 and 7:10, in ever more annoying tones. Just as I’d set it up anticipating the cunning ways of my consciousness to become alert just enough to carefully press the stop—careful, not the snooze—button, before slumbering again. Somewhat to my surprise I make it in time for meeting Liran to depart to Haifa. Technion University is next.

Small meeting again; we start with a handful of folks, but word goes on the grapevine and a few more join during the act. Nice! I pity Liran—he knows the talk by heart by now, including my jokes. I try to make a couple new ones to entertain him a bit, too. It all goes over nicely, and I get great questions. One that keeps on coming is: how do you debug all that compile-time code? To which I quip: “Ever heard of printf-based debugging? Yeah, I thought so. That’s pretty much what you get to do now, in the following form:”

pragma(msg, string_expression);

The expression is evaluated and printed if and only if the compiler actually “goes through” that line, i.e. you can use it to tell which branch in a static if was taken. It is becoming clear, however, that to scale up Design by Introspection more tooling support would be needed.

Back at Weka, as soon as I get parked by a visitor desk, folks simply start showing up to talk with me, one by one or in small groups. Their simple phonetic names—Eyal, Orem, Tomer, Shachar, Maory, Or, …—are a welcome cognitive offload for yours socially inept truly. They suggest improvements to the language, ask me about better ways to do this or that, and show me code that doesn’t work the way it should.

In this faraway place it’s only now, as soon as I see their code, that I feel at home. They get it! These people don’t use the D language like “whatevs”. They don’t even use it as “let’s make this more interesting.” They’re using it as strategic advantage to beat hardware storage companies at their own game, whilst moving unfairly faster than their software storage competitors. The code is as I’d envisioned the D language would be used at its best for high leverage: introspection, introspection everywhere. Compile time everything that can be done at compile time. It’s difficult to find ten lines of code without a static if in there—the magic fork in design space. I run wc -l and comment on the relatively compact code base. They nod approvingly. “We’ve added a bunch of features since last year, yet the code size has stayed within 5%.” I, too, had noticed that highly introspective code has an odd way of feeding upon itself. Ever more behaviors flow through the same lines.

Their questions and comments are intent, focused, so much unlike the stereotypical sterile forum debate. They have no interest to show off, prove me wrong, or win a theoretical argument; all they need is to do good work. It is obvious to all involved that a better language would help them in the way better materials can help architects and builders. Some template-based idioms are awfully slower to compile than others, how can we develop some tooling to inform us about that? Ideas get bounced. Plans emerge. I put a smudgy finger on the screen: “Hmm, I wonder how that’s done in other languages.” The folks around me chuckle. “We couldn’t have done that in any other language.” I decide to take it as a compliment.

A few of us dine at a fancy restaurant (got to sample the local beer—delicious!), where technical discussions go on unabated. These folks are sharp, full of ideas, and intensely enthusiastic. They fully realize my visit there offers the opportunity to shed collective months of toil from their lives and to propel their work faster. I literally haven’t had ten minutes with myself through the day. The only time I get to check email on my phone is literally when I lock myself into (pardon) a restroom stall. Tomorrow my plan is to sleep in, but there’s so much going on, and so much more yet to come, that again I can only sleep a couple of hours.

May 10 2017

Today’s the big day: the Google Campus Tel Aviv talk. We’re looking at over 160 attendees this evening. But before that there’s more talking to people at Weka. Attribute calculus comes on the table. So for example we have @safe, @trusted, and @system with a little algebra: @safe functions can call only @safe and @trusted functions. Any other function may call any function, and inference works on top of everything. That’s how you encapsulate unsafe code in a large system—all nice and dandy. But how about letting users define their own attributes and calculi? For example, a “may switch fibers” attribute such that functions that yield cannot be called naively. Or a “has acquired a lock” attribute. From here to symbolic computation and execution cost estimation the road is short! To be sure, that would complicate the language. But looking at their code it’s clear how it would be mightily helped by such stuff.

I got a lunchtime talk scheduled with all Weka employees in attendance, but I’m relaxed—by this point it’s just a family reunion. Better yet, one in which I get to be the offbeat uncle. My only concern is novelty—everything I preach, these folks have lived for two years already. Shortly before the talk Liran comes to me and asks “Do you think you have a bit more advanced material for us?” Sorry mate, I’m at capacity over here—can’t produce revolutionary material in the next five minutes. Fortunately the talk goes well in the sense that Design by Introspection formalizes and internalizes the many things they’ve already been doing. They appreciate that, and I get a warm reception and a great Q&A session.

As I get to the Google campus in Tel Aviv, late afternoon, the crowds start to gather. This is big! And I feel like I’d kill myself right now! I mentioned I take weeks to prepare a single public appearance, by the end of which I will definitely have burned a few neurons. And I’m fine with that—it’s the way it’s supposed to be. Problem is, this one week packs seven appearances. The hosts offer me coffee before, during, and after the talk. Coffee in Israel is delicious, but I’m getting past the point where caffeine may help.

Before the talk I get to chit chat incognito with a few attendees. One asks whether a celebrity will be speaking. “No, it’s just me.” He’s nice enough to not display disappointment.

There’s something in the air that tells you immediately whether an audience will be welcoming or not so much. Like a smell. And the scent in this room is fabulously festive. These folks are here to have a good time, and all I need to do to keep the party going is, in the words of John Lakos, “show up, babble, and drool.” The talk goes over so well, they aren’t bored even two hours later. Person in the front row seems continuously confused, asks a bunch of questions. Fortunately we get to an understanding before resorting to the dreaded “let’s take this offline.” Best questions come of course from soft-spoken dudes in the last row. As I poke fun at Mozilla’s CheckedInt, I realize Rust is also Mozilla’s and I fear malice by proxy will be alleged. Too late. (Late at night, I double checked. Mozilla’s CheckedInt is just as bad as I remembered. They do a division to test for multiplication overflow. Come on, put a line of assembler in there! Portability is worth a price, just not any price.) My talk ends just in time for me to not die. I’m happy. If you’re exhausted it means it went well.

May 11 2017

Again with the early wake-up, this time to catch a train to Beersheba. Zohar rides with me. The train is busy with folks from all walks of life. I trip over the barrel of a Galil. Its owner—a girl in uniform—exchanges smiles with me.

Two talks are on the roster today, college followed by Ben Gurion University. The first goes well except one detail. It’s so hot and so many people in the room that the AC decides—hey, y’know, I don’t care much for all that Design by Introspection. It’s so hot, folks don’t even bother to protest my increasingly controversial jokes about various languages. I take the risk to give them a coffee break in the middle thus giving them the opportunity to leave discreetly. To my pleasant surprise, they all return to the sauna for part deux.

The AC works great at Ben Gurion University, but here I’m facing a different problem: it’s the dreaded right-after-lunch spot and some people have difficulty staying awake. Somebody gives up and leaves after 20 minutes. Fortunately a handful of enthused (and probably hungry) students and one professor get into it. The professor really likes the possibilities opened by Design by Introspection and loves the whole macro expansion idea. Asks me a bazillion questions after the talk that make it clear he’s been hacking code generation engines for years. Hope to hear back from him.

Just when I think I’m done, there’s one more small event back at Weka. A few entrepreneurs and executives, friends of Weka’s founders, got wind of their successful use of the D language and were curious to have a sit down with me. One researcher, too. I’m well-prepared for a technical discussion: yes, we know how to do safety. We have a solution in the works for applications that don’t want the garbage collector. “So far so good,” told himself the lamb walking into the slaughterhouse.

To my surprise, the concerns these leaders have are entirely nontechnical. It’s all about community building, leadership, availability of libraries and expertise, website, the “first five minutes” experience, and such. These people have clearly have done their homework; they know the main contributors by name along with their roles, and are familiar with the trendy topics and challenges within the D language community.

“Your package distribution system needs ranking,” mentions a CTO to approving nods from the others. “Downloads, stars, activity—all criteria should be available for sorting and filtering. People say github is better than sourceforge because the latter has a bunch of crap. In fact I’m sure github has even more crap than sourceforge, it’s just that you don’t see it because of ranking.”

“Leadership could be better,” mentions a successful serial entrepreneur. “There’s no shortage of great ideas in the community, and engagement should be toward getting work done on those great ideas. Problem is, great ideas are easy to debate against because almost by definition what makes them great is also what takes them off the beaten path. They’re controversial. There’s risk to them. They may even seem impossible. So those get pecked to death. What gets implemented is good ideas, the less controversial ones. But you don’t want to go with the good ideas. You want the great ideas.”

And so it goes for over three hours. My head is buzzing with excitement as Zohar drives us back to the hotel. The ideas. The opportunities. The responsibility. These people at Weka have a lot riding on the D language. It’s not only money—”not that there’s anything wrong with that!”—but also their hopes, dreams, pride of workmanship. The prime of their careers. We’ve all got our work cut out for us.

I tell Zohar no need to wake up early again tomorrow, I’ll just get a cab to the airport. I reckon a pile of backlogged work is waiting for him. He’s relieved. “Man, I’m so glad you said that. I’m totally pooped after this week. I don’t know how you do it.”

Funny thing is, I don’t know either.

The D Language Foundation Google Summer of Code 2016 Postmortem

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Craig Dillabaugh was first drawn to D by its attractive syntax and Walter Bright’s statement that D is “a programming language, not a religion”. He maintains bindings to the geospatial libraries shapelib and gdal, volunteered to manage the GSoC 2015 & 2016 efforts for D, and has taken it on again for 2017. He lives near Ottawa, Canada, and works for a network monitoring/security company called Solana Networks.


The 2016 Google Summer of Code (GSoC) proved to be a great success for the D Language Foundation. Not only did we have, for us, a record number of slots allotted (four) and all projects completed successfully, perhaps most important of all we attracted four excellent students who will hopefully be long time contributors to the D Language and its community. This report serves as a review for the community of our GSoC efforts this past summer, and tries to identify some ways we can make 2017 an equal, or better, success.

Background

Back in 2011 and 2012, Digital Mars applied to participate in, and was accepted to, Google Summer of Code. In each of those years we were awarded three slots and had successful projects. Additionally, a number of long time D contributors, including David Nadlinger, Alex Bothe, and Dmitry Olshansky, were involved as students. Sadly, in the succeeding two years we were not awarded any slots. After 2014’s unsuccessful bid, Andrei asked on the forums if anyone wanted to take the lead for the 2015 GSoC, as he had too many things on his plate. This is when I decided to volunteer for the job.

I prepared for the 2015 GSoC and worked on getting some solid items for our Ideas page. I even prepared what I thought was a beautifully typeset document in LaTeX for our final submission. Needless to say, I was very disappointed when I had to copy/paste each section into the simple web form that Google provided for submissions. Sadly, that year we were rejected once more, though I felt our list of ideas was solid.

We applied again in 2016 for the first time as The D Language Foundation. Again, the community contributed lots of solid suggestions for the Ideas page and we were accepted for the first time in four years. I think that perhaps getting accepted involves a bit of luck, as our ideas were similar to, or repeated from, those that were not accepted in 2015. However, more effort was put into polishing up the page, so perhaps that helped.

The Selection Process

Once we were accepted as a mentoring organization, the process of receiving student proposals began. We received interest from a large number of students from all over the world (about 35). In the end, a total of 23 proposals were officially submitted, ranging from very short–obviously last minute–pieces, to several excellent efforts, including Sebastian Wilzbach’s 20-page document.

Our selection process was, I felt, very rigorous. We had seven of our potential admins/mentors screen the initial proposals. This involved reading all 23 proposals, which was a significant amount of work. From this initial screening we identified eight students/proposals that we thought could become successful projects. We then had all mentors individually rank each of the shortlisted proposals, another significant time commitment on their part.

Finally, interviews were arranged with all eight students. In most cases, two mentors interviewed each student, and the interviews were fairly intense, job-style interviews that involved coding exercises. A number of our mentors were involved in this process, but I think Amaury Sechet interviewed all of the students. It is no small feat to arrange and then conduct interviews with students in so many different time zones, so a huge thanks to all the mentors, but Amaury in particular. Those involved in the screening/interview process included Andrei Alexandrescu, Ilya Yaroshenko, Adam Ruppe, Adam Wilson, Dragos Carp, Russel Winder, Robert Schadek, Amaury, and myself.

Awarding of Slots

The next step for our organization was to decide how many slots we would request from Google. I really had no idea what to expect, but I was hoping we might get two slots awarded to us, as there were many good organizations vying for a limited number of slots. We felt that most of the short-listed projects could have been successful, but decided to not be too greedy and requested just four slots. As it turned out, perhaps we should have asked for more; we were awarded all four. We then selected our top four ranked students from the interview process. They were, in no particular order:

  • Sebastian Wilzbach: Science for D – a non-uniform RNG (Ilya Yaroshenko mentor)
  • Lodovico Giaretta: Phobos: std.xml (Robert Schadek mentor)
  • Wojciech Szeszol: Improvements to DStep (Russel Winder mentor)
  • Jeremy DeHaan: Precise Garbage Collector (Adam Wilson mentor)

Summer of Code

Once the projects were awarded, I must say that most of my work was done. From there on the mentors and students got down to work. I tried to keep tabs on progress and asked for regular updates from both the mentors and the students. These were, in most cases, promptly provided.

While there were some challenges, and a few projects had to be modified slightly in some instances, everyone progressed steadily throughout the summer, so there were no emergencies to deal with. All of our students passed their mid-term evaluations and by the end of the summer all four projects were completed (although Jeremy has some on-going work on his precise GC). As a result, everyone got paid and, I presume, everyone was happy.

In addition to our original mentors, thanks are due to Jacob Carlborg (DStep) and Joseph Rushton Wakeling (RNG) for providing additional expertise.

Mentor Summit

Google offered money for students to attend academic conferences and present results based on their GSoC work. Google also offered to pay travel costs for two mentors to travel to the mentor summit in California. Regrettably, none of our students had the time to take advantage of the conference money, but Robert Schadek was able to attend the Mentor Summit from Oct 28th to 30th in Sunnyvale, California. There he was able mingle with, and learn from, mentors from the other organizations that participated.

Looking Forward

It is hard to believe, but the process starts all over again in a few short months. The success of this past year will create expectations for 2017, and I hope that we can replicate that success. A number of lessons were learned from this past year that we can carry forward into the next round. So in this section, I will try to distill some of what we learned to help guide our efforts in the coming year.

The Ideas Page and Advertising

Most of the work of identifying projects was carried out through the D Forums, with the odd email to past mentors. This was generally successful, but a number of proposals from previous years ended up being recycled. While it may be inevitable, it seemed that many of the proposal ideas were added at the last minute. Since a number of our best ideas from the 2016 page are now completed projects, we will need to replenish the Ideas page for 2017.
Recommendations

  1. We should post a PDF version of one of the successful proposals on our Ideas page to give students an example of what we expect. Although it was excellent, we likely shouldn’t use Sebastian Wilzbach’s treatise, as that may scare some people off.
  2. Try to get a decent set of solid proposals with committed mentors earlier in the process. In 2016 a number of the mentors were signed up at the last minute. The earlier the proposals are posted the more time we have to polish them and make them look more attractive.

Interview and Selection Process

The selection process went well, but was a lot of work. Having input from a number of different mentors/individuals was invaluable.
Recommendations

  1. Streamline the selection process, but reuse much of what was done last year. Having a rigorous selection process was a key contributor to 2016’s success.
  2. Start the interview portion of the selection process earlier so that we have more time to set up and carry out the interviews.

Project Progress and Mentoring

Much of the success of an individual project involves having a good relationship and work plan between the student and mentor. From this perspective, the organization isn’t heavily involved. Since all of our students worked well with their mentors, even less organizational administration was required. This is a byproduct of good screening and a solid set of ideas, and being fortunate enough to get good students.

However, there are areas where we could have run things a bit better. Students and mentors were asked to regularly provide updates on their progress, and they generally did this well, but there was no formal reporting process. Also, it would be worthwhile to have a centralized collection of project timelines/milestones where administrators and others involved in the projects (we had a few individuals working in advisory roles) can keep an eye on project progress.

Recommendations

  1. We should keep a centralized version of project timelines somewhere (ie. Google Docs Spreadsheet) where we can check on project milestones. This should be shared with all individuals involved in a project (student/mentors/advisors/admins).
  2. Have a more formalized process for students and mentors reporting on their progress. This would involve weekly student updates and biweekly mentor updates.

Summary

The 2016 GSoC was a great success, and with any luck will be a good foundation for our successful participation in the year to come. We were fortunate that everything seemed to fall nicely into place, from our being awarded all four projects, to having all of our students complete their projects. Perhaps Sebastian, Lodovico, Wojciech or Jeremy will be involved again as students (or even mentors), and in any case continue to contribute to the D Language.

Happy New Year from the D Language Foundation

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Ali Çehreli uses D professionally at Weka.io, is the author of Programming in D, and is frequently found in the D Learn forum with ready answers to questions on using the language. He also is an officer of the D Language Foundation.


Happy 2017!

2016 was filled with many great things happening for the D community:

All of that was achieved by you through your direct contributions or the donations that you’ve made.

We look forward to another great year filled with many cool things happening in the D world. We can’t wait to see your work on D in 2017, some of which we hope to hear about at DConf 2017. 😀

The D Language Foundation’s Scholarship Program

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d6The D Language Foundation recently announced a new scholarship program aimed at EE and CS majors attending University “Politehnica” Bucharest (UPB). I contacted Andrei Alexandrescu for a few details on how the initiative came together, hoping for just enough tidbits of backstory to craft a blog post around. He obliged in a big way, turning my one question and “a few details” into an informative conversation.

Mike: I assume quite a lot of work went into this. Could you share a few details about how it came about?

Andrei: Gladly! The story starts back in 2012, when I gave a talk at the How to Web conference in Bucharest, my native city. It was a great event and I got to meet many great people. Except for one whose name kept coming up all over the Romanian IT space, Andrei Pitis.

I heard he was an instructor in the CS department at UPB (the best IT school in Romania, also noted internationally). He’s been directly involved in a number of IT-related foundations and professional organizations, and he created and led the immensely successful Vector Smart Watch startup. So, having heard he’d be around, I went to the conference speakers’ dinner hoping to bump into him.

Not knowing what he looked like, I was just craning my neck in search of someone who seemed popular. Meanwhile, I was passing time by making chit chat with a nice fellow who introduced himself to me. Now, you know how these group parties go. There’s always loud music and conversation, so I didn’t even hear his name and assumed he hadn’t heard mine.

As the evening progressed, I figured Andrei Pitis wasn’t going to show, so I had more time to chat with that fine gentleman. And I noticed two things. First, he was incredibly insightful. Second, he seemed equally excited about meeting me as I was about meeting Andrei Pitis. After a long while, the coin dropped: they were one and the same.

Thus started a great friendship. Andrei gave me great tips about how to start and conduct The D Language Foundation. Recently, he introduced me to two UPB CS systems professors, Razvan Deaconescu and Razvan Rughinis (together, the three had created the Tech Lounge nonprofit organization dedicated to helping graduating CS students start their careers).

Razvan Rughinis came up with the scholarship idea while we were chatting over beers in the quaint old town of Bucharest. In great part the idea was motivated by the strong interest UPB systems graduate students had in participating in a high-impact open source project such as the D language as part of their MSc thesis. In systems research (unlike e.g. CS theory), actual system building is a key part of the research project; therefore, a visible OSS project makes for a much stronger dissertation than the usual throwaway experimental code.

Clearly a strong opportunity had presented itself, and the DLang UPB scholarship is its realization.

Mike: How does the selection process work?

Andrei: The two professors introduce a few candidates, which I pass through the rigors of the typical Facebook interview. We also ask for the usual suspects – proof of enrollment, transcripts, motivation letter, and references.

Of all components, the most important are (in order) the interview, the quality of the BSc projects, and the recommendation letters from their professors. The four current scholarship recipients passed the interview with flying colors and have very strong BSc projects and references. Some of them returned from summer internships at prestigious companies such as Bloomberg, others won CS awards. I have no doubt any company in the Bay Area or elsewhere would be happy to work with them. Once they finish their MSc, of course :o).

And I should mention here that the two professors aren’t only involved in the selection process. They will make themselves available to help manage the students on an ongoing basis. We’re very fortunate to have them.

Mike: Can you provide any info on the current recipients and their projects?

Andrei: The current recipients are Alexandru Razvan Caciulescu, Lucia Cojocaru, Eduard Staniloiu, and Razvan Nitu. I have posted an introduction to each on the D forums and, now that you mention it, I told them to create a wiki page with a blurb for each. They are hosted in a nice shared office kindly donated by Tech-Lounge.ro and… we’re in the process of getting a coffee machine up there :o).

They are all obviously interested in taking large systems projects that benefit their research interests and have an impact on the D language. To get them started, I took a page from Facebook’s practice and defined a “bootcamp” program. Bootcamp is a month-long process (six weeks at Facebook) during which the so-called n00bs get familiar with the technologies used in the organization: the language proper; the core runtime and standard library; the build process; the way code changes are created, reviewed, accepted, and committed; and, last but not least, the community ethos and the kind of problems we are facing that are fit for ingenious solutions.

To kickstart the bootcamp program, I defined a “bootcamp” label in our Bugzilla and applied it to a bunch of existing bugs, with an eye for the kind of bug that simultaneously has low surface (you don’t need to know a lot of internal details to get into it) and offers a good learning experience. Right now each student is busy fixing a couple of such bugs.

Long-term we are looking at high-impact libraries and tools. I do have a few ideas, but I have no doubt the students will come up with their own. Just give them time.

Mike: Speaking of time… is there any room here for an update on the D Foundation’s finances?

Andrei: Of course. To be honest, right now we’re in better shape than ever before (and than I would have hoped). Thanks to Sociomantic, who footed a large part of DConf 2016’s bills, we have quite a bit of change left from conference registration fees. I have also personally carried a number of high-profile appearances at public tech events and private corporate training events, with proceeds flowing to the Foundation.

So we have accumulated a little war chest – not much, but definitely not negligible. With our current funds and operational costs, we are covered for over two years. Of course, the situation is fluid and I am working on expanding both income and (useful) expenditures.

We’re running a very tight operation, and I want to keep it that way. By the Foundation bylaws, its officers (Walter Bright, Ali Çehreli, and myself) cannot get income from the Foundation, which preempts a variety of conflicts of interest. We are a public charity, which reduces and simplifies our taxation. We use modern, low-overhead money transfer methods such as transferwise.com and constantly scan for better ones. Anyone who considers donating should know that about every five dollars donated goes straight to pay for one hour of an exceptional graduate student’s time.

Mike: Are there more applications in the queue? Do you plan to extend scholarships to other universities?

Andrei: UPB seems to be off to a great start, but it’s also a happy case for many reasons: it’s my undergrad alma mater, we know professors there, and we don’t need to pay tuition. If we wanted to extend a scholarship to another university we’d need to avail ourselves of similar strategic advantages. Needless to say, if anyone who reads this has ideas on the matter, please contact me.

Anyhow, for the time being, we got one more strong DLang UPB scholarship application literally today.

Mike: To close out, is there anything you’d like to say to people who’d like to help out?

Andrei: I’m very excited about this scholarship program and possible extensions to it. The reason for my excitement is that this is but a part of a larger strategy. Allow me to explain.

Up until now, we had no idea what to do with money even if we had it. A while ago, I met this potential donor who said, “OK, say I gave the Foundation half a million dollars over two years, no strings attached. What would you do with it?” To my own surprise, I had only vague answers. I asked Walter the same question, and he had even less of a clue than me.

So then I figured it’s essential for the Foundation to have a strong response to that. I’m a big believer in the adage “luck helps the prepared”, of which the converse is “luck is wasted on the unprepared”. By that paradigm, not knowing what we’d do with money was a definite way to ensure we’d never be big. Now that we have the scholarship program, there exists a powerful reason for people to donate to the Foundation: donations help us find and support good students to work on high-impact D-related projects that push the state of CS systems research forward.

Another thing that would be great to have “donations” of is contributor time. Receiving more students starts pushing against our management capacity. Currently, and somewhat to my surprise, I am effectively a manager, seeing that all of these things I just gave you an earful of (bringing money in to the Foundation, managing bootcamp, finances, operations) take enough time to be a full-time job that leaves little time for coding. At some point, I won’t be able to help everyone with their research, so I’ll need to delegate some of that work to other folks. I’m talking any capacity here – from code reviews to managing to co-authoring papers to co-advising.

There are more things I have in mind, but it’s early to share those. In brief, we need to organize ourselves for further growth. What’s clear to me is we’re no longer a seat-of-the-pants operation in a (virtual) basement. The D Language is exiting its adolescence.

Recent D Foundation Activities

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Welcome to the official D Blog!

My name is Michael Parker. With the launching of The D Blog, I’ve been fortunate enough to land the role of Blog Author, which means I’ll be making most of the posts around here. This blog will become your source for DLang news, inside looks at projects in the D community, and updates on happenings behind the scenes of language development and at the D Foundation. Consider it a complement to Adam Ruppe’s excellent weekly summary of D goings on, This Week in D. For this inaugural post, I’ve got three news items to pass along about some of the ways the D Foundation is working to promote D.

Lately, Andrei Alexandrescu has been doing a lot of talking in places other than conference stages. For one, he’s been having discussions with the Tech Lounge Foundation in Romania, an organization which, among other endeavors, works to help CS and engineering students and aspiring professionals move beyond their education. Specifically, the D Foundation is interviewing recent graduates and current graduate-level students to explore ideas for high-impact academic and industrial D projects. Not only could this result in a killer project or two for D, it could bring new faces into the community.

A second line of communication is active between Andrei and the University “Politehnica” of Bucharest, where he has had talks with the university’s Vice President Corneliu Burileanu and Director of the Telecommunications Department Eduard-Cristian Popovici. The focus of these discussions has been on finding opportunities for the university and the D Foundation to collaborate. Potential areas of cooperation in this realm include D-centric courses and joint projects developed with D.

Moving out of Romania and up into Scandanavia, Andrei was scheduled to host a D workshop on June 6 at NDC Oslo. That has now been canceled because of a scheduling conflict. Instead, he will be presenting a day-long consulting session at Cisco Norway. He will also be presenting a talk on D during lunch. All proceeds from the event will go straight to the D Foundation.

If you have any feedback on the blog theme, I would love to see it over in the forums. Be sure to keep an eye on this space, or subscribe to the feed, so you can stay up to date. And if you maintain a D project large or small, be on the lookout for an email from me. I’m getting ready to pick a target for the D Blog’s first project highlight.